1900-1909 Newspaper Notices

Obituaries, Deaths, Marriages, Birthdays, and Notices
from Washtenaw County Newspapers
1900-1909


Compiled by Bobbie Snow and Contributors
 
1840s | 1850s | 1860s | 1870s | 1880s | 1890s | 1900s
1910s | 1920s | 1930+ | ???? | Index A-L | Index M-Z
Introduction | Terms, Titles, & Abbreviations | Submit News Item

 
This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.

Date/Day
YYYY/MM/DD

Newspaper/
Source Type

Text

ca 1901/02/14
Thursday

Ypsilanti
Sentinel-
Commercial

[article]
Pg.1

JOHN TERNS DIED SATURDAY
The Well Known Alderman Passed Away
DUE TO ACCIDENT
A Sketch of the Life of the Watch-Dog of the Treasury of Ypsilanti.

Ald. John Terns died Saturday morning about 8 o'clock at his home No. 318 E. Congress street. Some time ago he met with a severe accident at the pond where he was cutting ice in which his leg was severely bruised. He kept at work, however, for a time until his limb became so swollen that is was necessary to call a physician. Dr. Hull was called and found it necessary to lance the bruised place and from it he extracted a large amount of bad blood. He told Mr. Terns that he must stay in and take care of himself. His anxiety relative to work, however, led him to go to the pond again. Finally he was compelled to take to his bed. At last erysipelas set in and this caused his death. Mr. Terns was a man with a very vigorous constitution but he was unable to withstand the severe injury and the disease which was thereby brought on.

Mr. Terns was born at Olingen, Germany
[sic] Sept. 25, 1849 and consequently was in the 52nd year of his age. He came to the United States and settled in Ypsilanti when he was 18 years old. He worked for a year in Cornwell's paper mill. Then he took a course in the Maythew Business college, after which he returned to Ypsilanti and embarked in the grocery business. Later he opened a saloon and has continued in that business up to the present time.

About twenty years ago he was elected alderman from the fifth ward and he was continued in the council for twelve successive years. Then he was
[illegible] out for two years and then elected for two years. Then again he was out for two years and then elected again. He was still serving on this last term at the time of his death. He was an honest, fearless and valuable member of the council and was almost always in his place at council meetings. In politics he was a democrat and was in the habit of attending the caucuses and convention of his party with much faithfulness.

September 16, 1873, he was married to Miss Mary Seesing, who with two daughters, Misses Catharine and Matie and a son Willie survive him.

[Contributed by Georgia Clark, lux1917 (at) gmail.com] [e-mail updated 10-16-11 jet]

ca 1901/02/14
Thursday

Ypsilanti
Sentinel-
Commercial

[article]

COUNCIL WILL MISS ALD. JOHN TERNS
THEY TAKE ACTION EXPRESSING THEIR FEELING
The Council Hall Will be Draped For Thirty Days-
He Had Served Fifteen Years as Alderman

A council meeting was held Saturday evening at the office of City Clerk McGregor to take action upon the death of Alderman John Terns. All were deeply impressed, and showed by their demeanor their feeling over the sudden loss which the council and the members personally had suffered.

The first resolution was presented by Ald. Yost and was that the members of the council and the mayor attend the funeral of the late alderman and that the ex-mayors and ex-aldermen be invited to accompany them. It was not included in the motion but an informal request was made that the press of the city announce that the ex-mayors and ex-aldermen who decide to accept the council's invitation are asked to hand in their names to the city clerk that adequate arrangements may be made for their accommodation in the carriages to be furnished by the city.

On motion of Ald. Moore the mayor appointed a committee of five aldermen and City Attorney Green to draw up resolutions expressing the council's sympathy with the bereaved family and to present the family with a copy.

Aldermen Moore, Yost, Stevens, Van Fossen, Boyce and City Attorney Green constitute the committee.

Ald. Moore offered the motion that the supplies committee be instructed to drape the council hall with suitable mourning emblems which are to be kept in place for 30 days.

Ald. Yost moved that a committee be appointed to make arrangements for carriages and for a floral emblem and Mayor Scovill named Ald. Yost, Gaudy
[?] and Stevens for the sorrowful duty.

The Aldermen passed a few moments conversing on the sterling qualities which brought Mr. Terns 12 consecutive years of service in the council and a term and a half besides and then the meeting was adjourned.

In the convocation which followed the adjournment of the council, it was clearly shown that his confreres in the city government considered Alderman Terns as a valuable member, possessing sound judgment and the strictest honesty.

[Contributed by Georgia Clark, lux1917 (at) gmail.com] [e-mail updated 10-16-11 jet]

ca 1901/02/14
Thursday

Ypsilanti
Sentinel-
Commercial

[article]

BIG TURN OUT AT FUNERAL

St. John's Catholic church was taxed to the capacity Tuesday at the occasion of the funeral of John Terns. The address was given by Father Kelly of Ann Arbor and Fr. Goldrick and Fr. Kennedy assisted in the services. When the funeral cortege left the church for the cemetery it was headed by the Arbeiter Society in a body. Then came the city officials and ex-officials, then the hearse, the family and friends. Among the ex-city officials present were ex-Mayors Putnam, Allen, Glover and Wells and ex-aldermen Sweet, George, Durand, Forsythe and Davis. At the cemetery a large tent had been erected over the grave and the brief services there were conducted under this tent. Deep feeling was shown by all present.

[Contributed by Georgia Clark, lux1917 (at) gmail.com] [e-mail updated 10-16-11 jet]

1901/10/09
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]
Pg.?

THE DEATH OF FRANK HANGSTERFER

George Hangsterfer has received a paper giving a column article about the death and funeral of his brother, Frank C. Hangsterfer, at Champaign, Ill. It shows that his brother was there like in this city very much respected and had made friends of everyone whom he met. He very popular with the railroad men. The Champaign Press says: "Engineers, who have met death at the throttle died no more bravely than Frank Hangsterfer. Less than 24 hours after leaving his engine his tired body was reseting in the long sleep that knows no awakening on this earth. Nature, which for more than two years had been compelled to do the bidding of his indomitable will power, at last refused to respond to his wishes. Hemorrhage of the stomach and bowels, which had upon several occasions brought him to death's door, ended his career at Momence at 6:30 o'clock Saturday night, Sept. 24. Frank C. Hangsterfer was born May 14, 1862 in Ann Arbor, Mich., and since he was 17 years of age has been a railroader. At Detroit, Mich., in '79, he accepted a position as fireman on the Michigan Central, and four years later was made an engineer. He left the Michigan Central to run a construction train engine engaged in laying the tracks of the T. & A. A. road, and upon its completion was given a passenger run, being in charge of the first passenger train ever run over the road. He remained there until about 13 years ago, when he accepted a position with the C. & E.I. and made his first trip Aug. 28, 1895. He was on a freight until two years ago when he was given extra running on passenger and after a while assigned to the Tuscola plug. His ailment gave him much trouble and he was laid up nearly two years with it. Mr. Hangsterfer was married in Champaign on Nov. 25, 1891, to Miss Kate Monohan. Three children, Francis, Marie and Teresa were born to them and all survive. His aged mother is still living in Ypsilanti.

1902/01/08
Wednesday

unidentified
clipping

[article]
Pg.2

DEATH OF A PIONEER TEACHER.
PROMINENT FARMER WAS FOUND DEAD
John G. English, of Manchester, Dies of Heart Failure.

Manchester, Jan. 3.-John G. English died New Year's Day of heart failure. He had been ill for some time, but on the day of his death, was well enough to be around his farm, and was found dead in an outhouse. He was born in Ireland, came to Manchester when a small boy and was a prominent farmer, well known and highly esteemed.

1902/01/08
Wednesday

unidentified
clipping

[article]
Pg.2

Frank Baker, a railroad engineer at Maltoon, Ill., and a former Sharon boy, was killed recently. The funeral will be he held in the Sharon Center church today.

1902/01/08
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier-Register

[article]
Pg.2

FIRST JUDGE B. C. Farrand,
Washtenaw's First Judge of Probate Dead

Bethuel Clinton Farrand of Port Huron died after on illness of less than 10 days. The deceased was born in Cayuga N.Y. Dec. 13, 1820, and was a descendant of Nathaniel Farrand who emigrated from England and settled at Midford, Conn. in 1645. His father was the Hon. Bethuel Farrand, who came to Michigan with is family in 1825 and located in Detroit. A year later the family went to Ann Arbor, where the senior Farrand become the first judge of probate of Washtenaw Co. B. C. Farrand received his early education at Griffin academy, Ann Arbor, and when 19 years old went to Detroit to carry out his cherished purpose of fitting himself for the legal profession. In acquiring his knowledge of the law the young man had a hard struggle for existence, in which all the luxuries and most of the comforts of living were denied him. His courage and self-denial were severely tested, but by perseverance he won battle, and after becoming thoroughly grounded in the law was admitted to practice before the supreme court. Upon being admitted to the bar in 1843 Mr. Farrand settled at Palmer, now St. Clair, but remained there only one year, when he went to Port Huron and had resided there continuously since.

1902/01/08
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier-Register

[article]
Pg.2

Nicholas Arksey.

Nicholas Arksey, one of Washtenaw's earliest pioneers, passed on to the other shore on New Years morning, 1902, at Dexter, at the advanced age of nearly 87 years. He was laid to rest in Forest Hill cemetery. Mr. Arksey was born in Beeford, Yorkshire, Eng. May 7, 1815. He came to Canada in 1834, and in the spring of 1838 removed to Ann Arbor, where he engaged in the manufacture of wagons and carriages. Nov 5 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Bird. He leaves three children -Mrs. R. E. McCollum of Leadville, Co., Mrs H.C. Ripley, of Galveston, Texas, and B.F. Arksey, of Dexter, Mich. Mr. Arksey's business always received his constant and honest attention, yet he found time to interest himself in the affairs of the city and nation. During half a century, perhaps no more familiar figure was seen on the streets of Ann Arbor. He was a regular attendant of the Presbyterian church. His kindly nature led him ever to take the part of the oppressed. He was a devoted husband and a loving father.

1902/01/15
Wednesday
mismarked 01/16

Ann Arbor
Courier-Register

[article]
Pg.6

Mrs. O.L. Warner.

Mrs. O. L. Warner died yesterday morning at the home of her son, C. C. Warner, in Lodi. Mrs. Warner was over 80 years of age and the cause of death was general debility. Mrs. Warner is an old resident, having lived in Pittsfield for a long period of years. She leaves two daughters and one son to mourn her loss-Mrs. George Sperry and Mrs. Mary Hill, of S. State street and C. C. Warner. Notice of funeral will be given later.

1902/01/15
Wednesday
mismarked 01/16

Ann Arbor
Courier-Register

[article]
Pg.2

Died in Texas.

The friends of the late Mrs. Elmira Critchett, who at one time resided in Ann Arbor, will be interested in what the Monroe Commercial says about her: At El Paso Tex, on Thursday of inst. Week, of pneumonia, died Mrs. Elmira Critchett, relict of the late Judge Otis Critchett. The remains were brought to Monroe for burial, the funeral being held at the M.E. church New Years afternoon at 3 o'clock, being conducted by Rev. J.E. Jacklon and Rev. W. S. Barnett. Mrs. Crittchett's maiden name was Almira A. Warner and she was born in Mooreville, Washtenaw county 62 years ago. She married Judge Critchett in 1883, being a sister of Mr. Critchett's first wife. Judge Critchett died June 18, 1893, since which time Mrs. Critchett has traveled extensively. For the past two years she made her home in Los Angeles, Cal., but in September went to El Paso, Tex, where her only brother and as three of her four sisters, as well as her two stepsons, Clyde and Addie, lived. She was not feeling well for two weeks previous to her death, but no serious complications developed until 26 hours before her demise. At the funeral her three stepsons Clyde and Addie, of El Paso, and John of Pictou, Nova Scotia, and her sister, Mrs. Dansenberg, of Ann Arbor, were present, as well as other relatives from out of the city, and a large number of friends, for during her 12 years of residence in this City. Mrs. Critchett was universally beloved and admired for her sterling character and uprightness.

1902/01/18
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]
Ypsilanti Page

ALVAH WORDEN DIED SUDDENLY.
Made Much Money in Whip Sockets.
SPENT IT IN LITIGATION.
In Defending His Right to Manufacture What He Had Invented.

Alvah Worden, one of Ypsilanti's best known citizens, died this morning suddenly of heart trouble. He was about town as usual yesterday, and when called this morning at 7:15 he responded: "Yes, I'm coming." In a few moments his son heard a noise and went into his room and found him dying in his chair. He was all dressed but his shoes. His death was immediate and was occasioned by paralysis. Alvah Worden was born in Pembroke township, Genesee Co. N.Y. March 24, 1820, and was consequently nearly 82 years of age. His father, John S. Worden, came to Michigan in 1827 and located 160 acres of land in Superior township, where he lived until 1860, moving then to this city, where he died in 1875. Alvah Worden attended the schools of Superior township and when young learned the tinner's trade. In 1843 he entered into business in Ypsilanti, which he continued for 20 years and after two years retirement he again engaged in business, but retired again in 1869. He was twice married to Della R. Haven, daughter of G.R. Haven. He leaves a son, Frank Worden, who was engaged in the veneering business with him and also an adopted son, Joseph Worden. Mr. Worden was a man of great inventive genius and started into the business of making whip sockets, at first on a small scale, making them by hand. His business grew rapidly and he amassed quite a fortune. He was turning out whip sockets on a large scale, when Anson Searles, of New Jersey, sued him for infringement of patent and got an injunction preventing him from manufacturing. The suit dragged along for 13 years, when it was decided in Worden's favor in the supreme court. In the meantime the patents had expired and Worden had lost his money, spending $50,000 or $60,000 in the litigation. Cheaper whipsockets were on the market and he had thus lost the fount of his inventive genius. Mr. Worden was an active man, even in his later years, and every summer accompanied his son Frank to the north woods to look up birdseye maple. Last summer, over 80 years old, he walked 8 or 12 miles a day. The funeral service will be held Monday afternoon at 2:30 from the house.

1902/01/18
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]
Ypsilanti Page

Miss Clara Slauson, the 8 year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Slauson, of the Prospect Avenue laundry, died Friday morning at 3 o'clock of diphtheria and was buried at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon.

1902/01/23
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Argus

[column]
Ypsilanti Page

Mrs. Urvilla Hammond died at the home of her daughter, near Webberville today. She had lived in Augusta nearly all her life. She was the mother of George, Henry and Morris Hammond, of Augusta, David A. Hammond, editor of the Argus, Mrs. Thetis Grover [Groyer?] of Webberville, and Mrs. Linda Moorman of Grand Rapids.

1902/01/29
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[article]
Pg.3

OBITUARY

The entire community was shocked and pained Wednesday to hear of the death of Mrs. A. L. Noble, who died Wednesday, Jan. 22, of hear failure, at her home 320 S. Division street. She was born Dec. 25, 1847 in Carlton, New York and lived in New York until June 1871, when she married Mr. A. L. Noble and came with him to Ann Arbor to live. Mr. Noble, after a most honorable business career in this city, died in May 1894, leaving a widow and three children. The latter, Mr. Clarence Noble of Milwakee [sic], Mrs. Jas. H. Prentiss and Harry Noble of Ann Arbor, survive their parents. Mrs. Noble had been ill for several months and was so much worse the last week that the end was not unexpected. She "fell asleep" surrounded by her children. Mrs. Noble, soon after taking up her residence in this city, in 1871, became identified with the Methodist church and from that time until her death was one of its most loyal members, being on the official board when the messenger came bidding her depart to that realm where as a reward for her years of bravery and unselfishness she was to hear the words of her Master: "Well done, good and faithful servant, enter thou into the joy of thy Lord." In every good work for the uplifting of humanity Mrs. Noble was ever ready to lend a hand, and she gave freely of herself and her means to add to the sum of the world's happiness. The funeral was held Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the residence.

1902/02/07
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[article]
Pg.1

SUDDEN DEATH AT AGE OF 85.

Word has come of the death of Norman Showerman, a former well known Ypsilantian, at Lyons, Ia at the age of 85 years. Mr. Showerman was the son of the late Timothy Showerman, an old time Ypsilanti resident, and was an uncle of Frank and Fred Showerman and Louis and Guy Davis of that city, and the brother of Delos Showerman of Detroit. Mr. Showerman was apparently in the best of health Sunday evening, but a few moments after he had gone to his bedroom he was heard to fall and he was found dead. He was formerly an engineer employed in a car foundry at Davenport, Ia., where he had a reputation for efficiency and reliability. He left Ypsilanti about 50 years ago.

1902/02/07
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus

[column]
Pg.6

Word was received Saturday of the death of Mrs. Wm. Yocum at her home in Manchester. For a number of years Mrs. Yocum was a resident of Chelsea and has a sister and other relatives living here. She leaves a husband, two sons who are in business in Manchester and a daughter who resides in Brooklyn, Michigan.

1902/02/07
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus

[column]
Pg.6

DEATH OF AN AGED PIONEER.
F.M. HOOKER DIED AT CHELSEA SATURDAY MORNING

Chelsea, Mich. Feb. 2-F.M. Hooker, an old and respected resident of this village, died Saturday morning. For upwards of a year Mr. Hooker has been in poor health, but his demise was rather sudden and unexpected. He leaves three daughters, the wife of Dr. Thos. Shaw of Ypsilanti, Mrs. Higgins of Detroit, and Miss Katherine of this village.

1902/02/21
Wednesday

unidentified
clipping

[article]
Pg.1

DEATH OF A PIONEER TEACHER.
Mrs. Eliza Botsford Died in California.
LIVED THERE 21 YEARS.
She Taught in the Ann Arbor Schools from 1858 Until 1881

Mrs. Eliza Botsford, a former resident and pioneer teacher of Ann Arbor died Feb. 13 at the home of daughter, Mrs. T. F. Graber, at Berkeley, Cal. The Berkeley (Cal) Daily Gazete [sic], of Saturday, Feb. 15, publishes the following: "The funeral services of Mrs. Eliza Botsford, who died Thursday evening, were held today at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. T. F. Graber, 2037 Durant avenue, and at Cypress Lawn Cemetery, San Mateo county. Rev. George E. Swain, rector of St. Mark's church of Berkeley , officiated. The deceased lady's end was almost peaceful. Up to within three days of her death she was able to go to and from her room. On Wedneday afternoon she dropped into a quiet slumber, which continued until 6:30 p.m. Thursday, when she passed away. During a long life of noble womanhood, Mrs. Botsford exerted her influence for good. She was born in County Armagh, Ireland February 10, 1818. Her father was Dr. William Copeland, who prior to his coming to America, was a surgeon in the British navy, and her mother was a daughter of ??? S?e?rett , a country gentleman of County Armagh. In 1821 when Mrs. Botsford was but three and a half years of age her gather resigned his position in the navy and with his wife and child came to the United States and settled in the state of New York, where he soon became a very noted physician and practiced his profession up until the time of his death a few years later. The schools in New York offered poor facilities for a good education and the doctor took the education of his children upon himself, giving them the full benefit of his ????? training. Mrs. Botsford commenced teaching while yet in her teens in that state and soon afterwards, at the invitation of her cousin, William C. Blackwood, late of Hayards, Cal., went to Michigan near Ann Arbor to teach and soon afterwards married Mr. Binathan(?) Botsford,a native of Connecticut and descendant of the Pierpont and Edwards families of that commonwealth. At the time of her marriage, Mr. Botsford was a prominent merchant of Ann Arbor. She was left a widow after less than two years of a very happy married life, with a little daughter of a few months. She again took to teaching, this time as principal of some of the ward schools of Ann Arbor, and continued there until 1881, when after 35 years in that profession, she resigned her position, leaving a wide circle of friends, to come to California to reside with her daughter, Mrs. T. F. Graber, where she has since led a well earned, quiet and restful life. While in Ann Arbor she was a member of the First Presbyterian church of that place. She was a lady of exceptional education, tenacious memory and studious habits, keeping herself thoroughly posted upon all the news and current literature of the day. She was of a modest, retiring disposition and devoted to her daughter and family, making but few acquaintances after coming to Berkeley, but withal possessed of a genial disposition and a quick and ready wit, typical of the country of her birth. She leaves besides her daughter and family, a sister, Mrs. Mary B. Howard, widow, residing in Toledo, O. and a brother Capt. William Copeland, residing at Descanso, San Diego county, this state."

1904/01/13
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[obituary]
Pg.4

OBITUARY.
Mrs. Julia Rogers died early Friday morning. Julia Sheffield was born at Saratoga Springs, NY, April 13, 1814. Her youth was spent in New York state and she was married to Joseph Rogers Oct. 20,1 836 at Lyons, N.Y. They lived in Wayne Co., New York until they came to Michigan., reaching Ann Arbor, May 15, 1842, where she has resided ever since, with the exception of six years spent at Geddes and Detroit. Her early home in Ann Arbor was on the lot where the School of Music now stands, but in the spring of 1859 she moved into the house where she died. Of eight children, all of whom reached mature manhood and womanhood, but three survive her, two sons, Theodore and Mark, and one daughter, Clara, wife of A. A. Wood. She was the oldest member of the Presbyterian church, an excellent Christian woman and faithful attendant as long as she was able. For about ten years she has been a great sufferer, but was always so bright and cheerful that she was a favorite with children and young people. And to the last few would have expected here extreme age, 89 years and eight months. The funeral will be attended from her late residence, 832 Packard street, 2 p.m. Sunday.

1904/01/13
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[obituary]
Pg.8

HOMER BRIGGS DIED TUESDAY MORNING.
Had Been a Resident of Ypsilanti for 43 Years--
Was a Well-Known Drayman.

Homer Briggs died at his home, 421 Huron St., about one o'clock this morning in his 71st year. He was born in Litchfield Co. Conn., near Newburg, Feb. 12, 1833. At the age of 12 he went to Gaylord's Bridge to live with an uncle and there learned the shoemaker's trade. He came to Michigan in 1853, settling in Williamsville, Livingston Co., where with his brother he bought 80 acres of land, which they cleared and then sold. In 1855, he removed to Dexter, where he engaged in the manufacture of shoes. He came to Ypsilanti in 1861 and engaged in the dray business which he followed until about two or three years ago when failing health compelled him to retire from active business. In 1889, he became agent for the Standard Oil Co. at Ypsilanti, which position he held until about three years ago. He was married to Miss Lovina Brower in Ypsilanti, who survives him.

1904/01/13
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[obituary]
Pg.8

YPSILANTI. FOUND DEAD IN HIS BED
GEO THAYER PASSED AWAY IN THE NIGHT
He Was Prominent in Local Politics-
Is Survived by a Widow and Five Children.

Geo. Thayer of River street was found dead in his bed last Saturday. He was down town Friday and was apparently in good health. The doctor thinks he must have died about midnight and attributes the cause to heart disease. He is survived by a widow and five children, Will Thayer of Detroit, Mrs. Myra Pettis of this city, Miss Ella, who is at the School for the Blind, at Lansing, Miss Florence and Frank, who are living at home. He was prominent in local politics and last spring was the republican candidate for alderman of the fourth ward. He was about 54 years old.

1904/01/13
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[article]
Pg.?

YPSILANTI
DEATH OF MRS. MARY ALBAN

Mrs. Mary Alban died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Jesse Hewens, in Augusta, about two o'clock Friday morning, aged 79 years. Mrs. Alban, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Holmes, was born in Lincolnshire, England. She was married to Elias Alban in England, and their two children were born there. Their oldest child, a son, died in infancy and was buried in England. They came to America in the early '50s and at first located near Dentons, Michigan. In 1864 Mr. Alban bought a farm in Augusta and he and his wife lived on it until his death eleven years ago, since which time she has made her home with her daughter. She had lived in Augusta for 39 years and for miles around there was known as Grandma Alban. For many years she had been an active and devoted member of the Methodist church at Stony Creek. The funeral was held at Stony Creek Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

1904/03/04
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus-Democrat

[article]
Pg.?

Wm. F. Boyle died Tuesday morning of heart disease at the age of 67 years, at 513 Division street. He was born in New York state. He served in the civil war and was afterwards a commercial traveler and a farmer in Webster township. The funeral was held Thursday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Thomas church.
[Contributed by Mary Ferguson, mjfergus (at) tir.com, Comment: He was buried at St. Patrick's Cemetery, Northfield.]

ca 1904/03/14

unidentified
clipping

[article]
Pg.?

Milan, Mich., March 14. -- It has just been given out here that H. Clay Pepper, son of Mr. and Mrs. Olen Pepper, and Miss Bertha M. Cone, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Cone, were quietly married in the Methodist parsonage at Windsor, Ont., by Rev. A. Brown, pastor. They are both well known young people of this place, and will make their home in Detroit, Mr. Pepper having a position with the Stimpson Computing Scale Company.
[Contributed by Marjorie Shelton, mkshelton (at) aol.com, Comment: H. Clay Pepper, son of Olen & Ella (Thomas) Pepper, and Berth M. Cone, daughter of Joseph and Eva (DuBois) Cone were married 4 March 1904. An article about their 50th wedding anniversary appeared in the Ypsilanti paper where they were living in 1954.]

1904/03/16
Wednesday

Courier-Register
[article]
Pg.1

ROMANCE OF A MILAN GIRL
WENT TO DETROIT ON A VISIT
And While There She and Her Sweetheart
Went to Windsor and Got Married
(From Monday's Daily.)

When Miss Bertha M. Cone of Milan, Mich., went to Detroit about two weeks ago to visit a friend, she had no intention of getting married, having planned simply a pleasant vacation. Just a week ago Miss Cone returned to Milan, however, as Mrs. H. Clay Pepper.

H. Clay Pepper, the young groom, is an employe of the Stimson Computing Scale Co. in Detroit, and before he went to Detroit from Milan, a little over a year ago, was the avowed sweetheart of Miss Cone. Life in the big city did not cause Mr. Pepper to forget his village sweetheart and when he met her last week he proposed that they get married at once.

"We just thought," said the blushing groom, who appears about 20 years of age, "that we would get married, so we went over to Windsor a week ago Friday, and Rev. Alfred Brown, the Methodist clergyman, performed the ceremony. Saturday we went back to Milan to break the news to our families. Such things travel fast, however, and before we could see our friends most of them knew it already."

Mr. Pepper is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Olen Pepper of Milan, and Mrs. Pepper is a daughter of Joseph Cone of the same place. They are living now in Detroit.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Marjorie Shelton, mkshelton (at) aol.com]

1904/04/01
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[obituary]
Pg.1

Mrs. Augusta Keech, the wife of Thomas J. Keech, manager of the Michigan Telephone Co. in this city, died Tuesday of heart trouble at the age of 61 years. She was born in Lancaster, New York, and her maiden name was Miss Augusta Clapp.

Mrs. Keech had been a resident of Ann Arbor for thirty years, and she has a large circle of friends and acquaintances. She was always an active worker in the Congregational church and for many years was secretary of the Home Missionary society and a member of the church relief committee.

The funeral was held at the residence, 525 E. University avenue, Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock, the Rev. Mr. Patton officiating and will be private. The body will be placed in the vault and will later be removed to Buffalo, N.Y., for burial.

1904/04/01
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[obituary]
Pg.1

Frederick W. Podewils, of Northfield died Monday at the age of 77 years. He left a widow and one son and one daughter. The funeral was held at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock, the Rev. William Fischer officiating.

1904/04/01
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[column]
Pg.1

HOAG TAKEN TO COLORADO

A. C. Hoag was taken to Cripple Creek, Colo., by a deupty sheriff from El Paso county Col., Tuesday morning to face the charge of forgery. Hoag was arrested on complaint of the cashier of the First National bank of Cripple Creek. The prisoner was cheerful and expressed the utmost confidence in the favorable outcome of the affair, which he says is entirely due to misunderstandings with his wife. He claims that he and his wife were accustomed to draw on each others bank accounts. The sum involved was $60.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1904/04/01
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[column]
Pg.6

A.C. HOAG IN TOILS
Arrested on Charge of Uttering Forged Check
CRIPPLE CREEK
Is the Scene of An Alleged Crime - Fellow's Mother Will Settle

A.C. Hoag, a former Ann Arbor young man was arrested Sunday afternoon on a charge of forgery on complaint of the cashier of the First National Bank of Cripple Creek, Col. Deputy Sherriff G. F. Dayton, of El Paso county, Col., arrived in the city shortly after Hoag had been arrested by the sheriff's force, and he took the prisoner back with him Monday.

Hoag is charged with having forged his wife's name to a check for $60, and as the wife could not make good the sum, the bank officials caused his arrest. Hoag was in the city to visit his mother, and was taken into charge by the sheriff's force on request of the Cripple Creek authorities.

Deputy Dayton said that during the recent labor troubles in Cripple Creek Hoag acted as a deputy and did excellent work. He was faithful and courageous, and gave entire satisfaction to the authorities. After his work as deputy was at an end Hoag enlisted in the Colorado national guardsmen where he held a commission. His business is that of drug clerk, in which capacity he was employed in Cripple Creek.

Hoag says that the matter is all a mistake as he and his wife had separate bank accounts and were accustomed to sign each other's name to checks. He says that misunderstandings with his wife have caused her to repudiate the last check and allow the bank authorities to proceed against him.

Hoag's mother has stated to the officers here that she will settle up the matter, by making good the $60 and paying the expenses of the proceedings.

Hoag left Ann Arbor twelve years ago. He had an excellent reputation in Ann Arbor and Deputy sheriff Dayton says that he is also favorably known in Cripple Creek where he resided about two years.

1904/04/08
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[obituary]
Pg.5

Mrs. Elizabeth Allaby the wife of William Allaby of 332 Washington street, died Sunday of a complication of diseases. Her husband is a well known retired shoe merchant of the city. The funeral was held at the residence Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

1904/04/08
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[obituary]
Pg.5

Nathan Sutton, an honored resident of the county died at his home in Northfield, Saturday night. He was 63 years of age.

He was a member of the state legislature for this district in 1885, and has been prominent in county local politics. He was a life long member of the Pioneer Society of Washtenaw county, and in that connection assisted materially in gathering material and information for the valuable collection now in the possession of the society. He was a farmer, and had amassed a considerable competency.

Nathan Sutton was one of the most prominent and influential residents of the county. He had varied interests in life, and always kept thoroughly posted on the events of the time. He left a wife and three sons and one daughter. The funeral was held at the late residence Tuesday afternoon at 12:30. The Knight Templars will conduct the services at Forest Hill cemetery.

1904/04/08
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[obituary]
Pg.5

Mrs. Margaret Wagner, the widow of the late Joseph Wagner and one of the best known residents of the county, died Wednesday at the age of 75 years. She was born in Germany and lived in Scio for many years. She left two brothers and two sisters; Michael Staebler, proprietor of the American house; and Frederick Staebler, Mrs. Sarah Staebler, and Mrs. Barbara Rayer, all of this city; also six children, John, George and Charles, of Scio; Emanuel, Mrs. Christian Spaeth, of this city; and Mrs. Christian April, of Pittsfield. The funeral will be held at the residence Sunday morning at 10 o'clock with burial at Salem cemetery in Scio.

1904/06/08
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[article]
Pg.1

MRS. MARIAN McDONALD TAKES HER OWN LIF[E].
DESPONDENT DEXTER WOMAN SEEKS REFUGE
FROM ILL HEALTH AND WORLDLY CARES
IN THE WATERS OF THE HURON.

At about six o'clock Thursday morning Mrs. Marian McDonald, aged fifty-four years, of Dexter, committed suicide by jumping from the bridge over the Huron river at the junction of the Scio and Webster township lines. Her body was recovered last evening some two miles below the point from which it is believed she closed her life. Her neck was broken, indicating that in the fall she struck on her head. The remains were at once taken to the house and Coroner Watts, who had been summoned, decided that the circumstances of suicide were so manifest that an inquest was unnecessary and gave a burial permit to Undertaker George Higgins. Mrs. McDonald was the wife of Wm. J. McDonald and had been in feeble health for some time. She was greatly depressed in mind and a week ago sought her own life by taking laudanum. Since that time here sister-in-law, Mrs. Gary Briggs of Ypsilanti has been continuously with her and watched her movements closely as she talked freely of suicide and mentioned once or twice the method to which she finally resorted. Yesterday morning at half past five Mrs. Briggs thought she detected a movement downstairs and went below, but finding everything seemingly all right, returned to her room. An hour later on going down she was surprised to find that Mrs. McDonald had left the house. Hurrying in pursuit, she learned from neighbors that she had passed, going in the direction of the bridge. This is all that is definitely known of the circumstances, but all the conditions indicate that the surmise of suicide by jumping from the bridge was well founded. Funeral arrangements have not as yet been announced.

1905/??/??
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Daily Times

[article]

DIED OF TUBERCULOSIS.
Mrs. Anna Barbara Hintz, wife of Albert F. Hintz, 632 S. Ashley street, died at the family home Sunday morning of tuberculosis, aged 38 years. Mrs. Hintz was a daughter of Anton Teufel of 307 South Main street and has always resided in this city. Besides the husband two children survive – one a babe of four weeks. The funeral will be held from the residence tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. and from Bethlehem church at 2 o'clock.

1904/06/08
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[article]

BIRTHDAY ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATED SUNDAY. AN ENJOYABLE EVENT.
Mr. John Rose Passed the 81st Milestone-Four Generations Represented.

A very enjoyable gathering was held Sunday at the home of Mr. John Rose on Second street, it being the occasion of his 81st birthday. Mr. Rose came from England in 1845 to Ann Arbor, always living at his present home excepting the years 1866 to 1877, when he settled on the splendid farm now occupied by his son Charles, in Pittsfield township, who with Mrs. Waterman of Ypsilanti are the surviving members of the family, Mrs. Rose having passed to her rest in August, 1903. Since November of that year his grandson, Harry Rose, carrier on R.F.D. No. 6 and wife have resided with the hale and hearty old gentleman, who is still in full possession of his faculties, even reading without spectacles, and wonderfully alive to all public events of interest. Mr. Rose, with habitual energy and frugal habits, has accumulated considerable property which he deservedly enjoys. Last summer, in company with his grandson Everett, he attended the St. Louis Exposition, enjoying himself as much as the youngest. A life like that of Mr. Rose is a whole sermon of right living and success.

1905/??/??
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Times

[article]

LONG SUFFERING ENDED.
Mr. John Hauser, an old resident of Pittsfield township died today at his home near Saline, after a lingering illness, at the age of sixty years. The deceased leaves a widow and three children one daughter Mrs. Charles Schroen being a resident of this city until a short time ago, when she moved to Saline. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the home and at 2 o'clock from the German Lutheran Church at Saline, Rev. Karl Lederer officiating. Interment will be made at Saline.

1905/??/??
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Times

[article]

SUDDEN DEATH OF G.A. GILBERT. DIED THIS MORNING.
At Rochester, NY, as a Result of Stroke of Paralysis –Remains to be Brought Here.

Word was received by Joseph Parker this morning of the death of Geo. A. Gilbert of this city, at Rochester, N.Y. Mr. Gilbert, with his daughter, has been making his headquarters at Rochester this winter and last evening had a stroke of paralysis, which resulted in death at 4 o'clock in the morning. Mr. Gilbert has been a resident of this city nearly all his life and was educated in the city schools. For several years he was connected with the clothing business and afterward entered the railway postal service as a clerk. His advancement was rapid and he finally became chief clerk in the service for this district. When the rural mail service was inaugurated he was selected to assist in its organization and later became superintendent of that department, which office he held at the time of his death. Mr. Gilbert took great interest in the postal service and is said to have been one of the best posted men in the employ of the government. Mr. Gilbert was well known in this city and his death will be sincerely mourned. Of his immediate family there is surviving only a daughter, his wife having died about two years ago. He also has a brother residing in Chelsea and it is thought there is another brother living somewhere in the East. He was also a brother in law of Joseph Parker and son-in-law of Mr. And Mrs. William Fohey. Mr. Gilbert was a member of Ann Arbor Commandery, K.T. [Knights Templar] The remains will be brought to this city for interment, the time of funeral being announced later.

1906/01/12
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus-Democrat

[article]
Pg.1

DECREE GRANTED
Shelby Schurtz Legally Parted From Young Wife
WITHDREW FROM CASE
It Is Understood that She was Given $400 by Schurtz Family-- College Romance Comes to an End

Mrs. Eiting Schurtz was legally parted from her student husband, Shelby Schurtz, by decree of the judge at Grand Rapids Tuesday. The young husband began suit to have the marriage annulled and yesterday the wife filed a stipulation announcing her withdrawal from the case. The judge thereupon granted a decree.

The affair has attracted a great deal of attention at the University as Schurtz is a prominent fraternity man and known to a large number of the students. The young lady comes of an Ann Arbor family, who live on the west side.

The couple were married secretly and had lived together only four days when the groom's father came down from Grand Rapids and took the young husband away. The Schurtz family claim the the girl married Shelby simply to work him for money and the wife maintained that the match was a love affair and everything was peaches and cream until the father interfered.

The case came into the courts by the arrest of young Schurtz on the charge of non-support. His parents showed that he was under age and had not been emancipated from parental control, and the non-support case was dismissed. The young wife brought suit for damages against her parents-in-law, alleging alienation of affections, and the defendants got the service of summons set aside. The Schurtz family then began suit in Grand Rapids for annulment of the marriage, with the result of yesterday's decree.

Attorneys Cavanaugh & Wedemeyer represented the young wife and Attorney Arthur Brown looked after the legal interests of the young husband in the Washtenaw courts.

1906/01/12
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus-Democrat

[article]
Pg.1

JOHN MUEHLIG DIED SUNDAY
Was Born in Ann Arbor and Had Always Lived Here
For Many Years was Engaged in Furniture and Undertaking Business

John Muehlig of 315 South Main street died Sunday morning at seven o'clock after an illness of two months, aged 57 years.

The deceased was born in this city and has always been a resident here. For many years he was engaged in the furniture and undertaking business and about twelve years ago retired.

Mr. Muehlig is survived by a widow and five children: Floran J.; Bertha E., Edward R., Ernest O. and Walter G. Muehlig, all of this city, and one brother, Andrew Muehlig of the firm of Muehlig & Schmid. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at two o'clock, from the residence, 315 South Main street and was largely attended. Rev. A. L. Nicklas, pastor of the Zion Lutheran church was the officiating clergyman. The pallbearers were Frederick Schmid, J. Laubengayer, George Haller, Gottlieb Luick, George Blum, Paul Schall.

Music was furnished by the Zion Lutheran church choir. Many floral offerings were presented by friends. Among those present at the funeral were A. Sorg of Grand Rapids; Mrs. A. Brown, of Lansing; Mrs. Frank Nice, of Lansing; Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Horn of Detroit; Mr. and Mrs. D. Wiedemeyer of Saline; Mr. and Mrs. Clements of Saline; Mr. and Mrs. Henry Feldkampf of Manchester; Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Carr of Manchester, Mr. and Mrs. T. Feldkampf, Robert May of Detroit.

1906/01/12
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus-Democrat

[article]
Pg.1

OLD SETTLER PASSED AWAY

Ralph C. Whiting, aged 74 years, died Wednesday of heart trouble at the Arbor Hotel where he and Mrs. Whiting had been rooming.

Six weeks ago when his illness become more serious he was taken to the Homeopathic hospital, where he remained until a week ago, when he wished to be taken home. It was thought advisable to take him to the hotel where he died Wednesday.

He was born in Hartford, Connecticut, Jan.5, 1832. He came to Ann Arbor when he was about 14 years old, and was married when 22 to Miss Mary Collins of York townhsip. They have made their home in Ann Arbor ever since, celebrating their golden wedding a year ago.

1906/01/12
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus-Democrat

[article]
Pg.

OBITUARY
Mrs. Mary Woodbury, a well known nurse in the city died Thursday at her home 301 East Huron, aged 54 years. She leaves three sons, Benjaman
[sic] and Adolph of this city, and John D. of Connecticut. The funeral will be held Friday afternoon, at three o'clock from the residence. Rev. J. Mills Gelston, pastor of the Presbyterian church officiating. The body will be taken Saturday to Bowling Green, Ohio, for burial beside her husband.

1906/01/12
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus-Democrat

[article]
Pg.

Willis

Willis, Jan. 9-- Guy Thompson is on the sick list.
Burly Fuller is spending a few days with his brother, George, at Cherry Hill.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Cleaver and Mr. and Mrs. Orlie Smith spent Tuesday afternoon and evening with Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Freeman.
The Home Mission of the Friends church will meet with Mrs. Mary Breining this afteroon.
Wm. Freeman and George Thompson are spending the day in Ann Arbor.
Mrs. Emma Jones, who has been quite sick, is reported better.

1906/01/25
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Daily Times

[column]
Pg.4

Christian Fritz of Dexter was in the city yesterday calling on friends. Mr. Fritz emigrated to Washtenaw county in 1853, and on his arrival began work for Godfrey Miller, one of the old pioneers of Scio. Mr. Fritz is 73 years of age but enjoys excellent health and apparently his years do not weigh heavily upon him.

1906/01/25
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Daily Times

[column]
Pg.4

Relatives in the city received word yesterday afternoon of the sudden death of Harry Wallace at Delt, Montana, where he went last June for his health. Mr. Wallace had been employed as a motorman on the Ypsi-Ann but becoming ill with consumption it was thought best for him to join his brother Ray Wallace, at the latter's ranch in the west. The latest news before that of yesterday was to the effect that he was improving. A mother, Mrs. Marchus Wallace, the brother mentioned and one sister, Mrs. Cora Van Doren, survive. The remains will probably arrive here the first of the week.

1906/01/25
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]

POPULAR CONDUCTOR DIED IN MONTANA
Harry Wallace, formerly a conductor on the D.Y.A.A. & J. and a resident of this city, died at Montana of consumption. He went there recently for his health.

1906/01/25
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]

YOUNGAUER HAD ANKLE BROKEN
At the Fourth Ward school during the morning recess perioid, while the boys were playing, Frank Youngbauer was thrown to the ground in such a way as to break the bones of his left leg just above the ankle. A hurry-up call for Dr. E. K. Herdman, school physician, caught him as he was completing his inspection of the Sixth Ward school and he went immediately to the Fourth Ward to attend to master Youngbauer's injuries. The leg was put up in splints, the ambulance called for, and the boy, owing to the fact that his parents are poor, was taken to the University hospital.

1906/01/25
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]

SUICIDE'S WIDOW ONCE LIVED HERE
This morning's Free Press gives an account of the suicide of Chas. B. Seeley, draft clerk in the Grand Rapids National Bank. He shot himself through the lungs and brain yesterday morning. Ill health and straitened circumstances were undoubtedly the cause of the suicide. The bank's officials declare there is nothing wrong with Seeley's accounts. Mrs. Seeley was formerly Miss Elvira Camp of this city.

1906/01/25
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Daily Times

[article]
Pg.2?

AN YPSILANTI DIVORCE
Mrs. Emma Klawitter of Ypsilanti has begun suit against Adolph Klawitter for divorce. They were married on Christmas day, 1892, and have three children, two boys aged seven and eleven, and a girl aged nine years. She charges extreme cruelty. She claims that by washing clothes she earned enough money to buy a home in which all her money is, and that the title is in her husband's name. While admitting that her husband has a little money in the home, although not so much as she has, she asks that the home be decreed to belong to her and asks that the husband be ordered to pay $20 a month for the support of herself and the children. She wants custody of the children.

1906/01/26
Friday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]

HE SHOT HIMSEF WHILE AT WORK
Grand Rapids, Mich. Jan. 25--In the lobby of the Grand Rapids National Bank at 9:45 o'clock Wednesday morning, while the bank was full of customers, Charles Seeley, general clerk of the institution,while in the cage waiting on customers, suddenly reached behind him, picked up a gun, and shot himself in the head. He was removed to a hospital, but he died in a few minutes.

Despondency over ill health was the cause. He leaves a wife and two children. He is 33 years old. His financial condition is good and his accounts are straight.

1906/01/27
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[article]

CHAS. CARR IS DEAD
Was Resident of Ypsilanti for Thirty Years
WAS 73 YEARS OLD
One of City's Most Familiar Figures--Was Very Well Known

The death of Chas. E. Carr occurred yesterday afternoon at his home, 16 Hamilton street after a lingering illness. He was 73 years old and is survived by a widow and grand daughter, Mrs. Maud Brogard.

Mr. Carr had been a resident of Ypsilanti for over thirty years. For sometime after coming here he owned an independent express and delivery wagon, delivering groceries, etc. for a number of the business houses and later his entire time to nursing the sick. He was a member of the Carpenter Post and of the Royal Arcanum.

The funeral will be held Sunday at 2:30 at St. Lukes church and the bearers will be past commanders of the local post. Rev. Wm. Gardam will officiate.

1906/01/27
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

The funeral of Mrs. Catherine Collins, aged 83 years, will be held at St. John's church Monday morning. Mrs. Collins is survived by four children.

1906/01/27
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

The vestry of St. Luke's church will give a reception for Rev. and Mrs. Wm. Gardam at the church house Tuesday evening in honor of the tenth anniversary of Rev. Gardam's rectorship in Ypsilanti.

1906/01/27
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily Times

[column]

Ann Arbor Brevities

Mrs. D.L. White of Jefferson street is quite sick.

Wm. Weimer of Third street is quite seriously ill.

Frank E. Case has resigned his position at the Ann Arbor music store and will devote his time to piano tuning.

Supt. and Mrs. H. M. Slauson entertained about twenty-five friends at a dinner party last evening in honor of Rev. Arthur W. Stalker.

Mrs. Wm. Campion of North Maine street, who has been ill for some time and recently underwent an operation, is able to sit up.

William Klink, who has been in the employ of the Ann Arbor Railroad Co. as operator at Lakeland, has been transferred to this city. He will go from here to Toledo in a few days.

The Sunday school class of Mrs. R. W. Bunting will give an at home and social this evening at the Baptist Guild this evening, assisted by a number of young ladies of the church. A pleasant evening is promised, the proceeds to go toward the Sunday school piano fund. Admission is 10 cents.

Dr. Flemming Carrow who prior to his removal to Detroit was professor of Opthalmology in the medical department of the U. of M., has been honored by an appointment as consulting opthamologist to Harper hospital, Detroit, one of the leading institutions of its character in the country.

Mrs. Julia Garrett of 321 South Fourth avenue, fell inher room this morning and broke her left hip. Mrs. Garrett had just returned from breakfast and while taking off her wraps fell over the rockers of a chair. She is seventy-five years old and consequently her condition is rather critical.

Miss Lily Pierson of this city was united in marriage, in Chicago, Wednesday last to Mr. Herbert Johnson of this city. Miss Pierson is the sister of Mrs. Robert Carson and has many friends in the city, and Mr. Johnson was formerly a partner in the "Two Harrys" barber shop on State street. Mr. Johnson is now employed by the Pullman Co. and runs between Chicago and San Francisco. The young couple will make their home at 1248 Fulton street, Chicago.

1906/01/29
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

ANN ARBOR LOCALS
A double birthday party was given Sunday at the home of Adam Braun of Scio, for his daughter, Miss Florence Braun and Mr. George Andress of Buchanan. About 30 guests were present who enjoyed a sumptuous dinner which was served.

1906/01/29
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

ANN ARBOR LOCALS
Mrs. Lizzie Keubler wishes to announce the engagement of her daughter Lizzie to Earnest Schneeberger, the wedding will take place in the near future.

1906/01/29
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

ANN ARBOR LOCALS
George Osburne, an old resident of Saline township died Sunday morning at four o'clock, at his home in Saline.

1906/01/29
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

ANN ARBOR LOCALS
The marriage of Miss Lily Pierson of this city and Mr. Herbert Johnson of Chicago, took place last Wednesday, Jan. 24, in Chicago. Mr. Johnson is in the employ of the Pullman Co., and runs between Chicago and San Francisco. The bride and groom will reside at 1248 Fullton street, Chicago.

1906/01/29
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

ANN ARBOR LOCALS
Mrs. Rhode of Huron street was called to Sharon on account of serious illness of her aunt, Mrs. Gardner.

1906/01/29
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily Argus

[column]

ANN ARBOR LOCALS
The remains of Mr. Harry Wallace were brought here this morning on the 8:18 train over the Michigan Central. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 p.m. from the residence of Philip Baum, 525 South Division street.

1906/01/31
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[column]
Pg.8

Milan
[From Wednesday's Daily]

Mr. Armitage of Detroit is visiting Amos Taylor and wife, also other relatives in this locality. Mr. A. is a brother in law of Mrs. Taylor.

H. J. Zimmerman, who for twenty five years was engaged in the jewelry business here, died last Saturday at the age of 65 years. He has been ill for two years past. It is the general opinion that his death was caused by grief over the sudden death of his daughter, Edna, to whom he was greatly attached. He was a member of the Milan lodge F. & A.M. and was buried by that order from his residence on Wabash street Monday afternoon.

Wm. Lee Jr., living south of town, met with an accident last week which came very near causing his death. He was standing under the windmill weights dropped from a distance of twenty feet, giving him a glancing blow on the forehead, cutting his head open, necessitating several stitches. He has been confined to the house several days but the wound is healing and he will be able to be out in a short time. Mr. Lee has been very unfortunate lately. Only about a year ago he was struck by a train on the Toledo & Ann Arbor road, which laid him up several weeks. We sincerely hope that fate will turn over a new leaf for Mr. Lee, who seems to have had his share of trouble.

1906/01/31
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[column]
Pg.8

Ypsilanti Brevities
[From Monday's Daily]

The funeral of Mrs. Catherine Collins, a resident of the first ward over half a century, was held this morning at St. John's Catholic church.

The remains of Chas. B. Seeley who committed suicide at Detroit on account of ill health, were brought here for interment Saturday. Mrs. Seeley was formerly Miss Elvira Camp.

The remains of Mrs. Parthenia Roberts arrived in the city from Chicago yesterday and funeral services were held this afternoon, followed by interment in Highland cemetery. Mrs. Roberts was formerly Mrs. Sandford Wells, but left his city about a quarter of a century ago.

The funeral services for Mr. Chas. C. Carr, who died on Friday, were held yesterday afteroon at the Episcopal church, the members of the G.A.R., of which the deceased was a member, attending in a body. Mr. Carr was also a member of the A.O.U.W. and Royal Arcanum. He was 73 years of age and had lived in Ypsilanti for many years. A wife, brother, and sister, and a granddaughter, Mrs. Maude Brogan of this city, survive. Mr. Carr was a member of the soldier's relief commission of the county.

1906/01/31
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[column]
Pg.8

Ypsilanti Brevities
[From Tuesday's Daily]

J. E. McAllister, of Spalsbury's, passed the pharmaceutical examination recently held at Ann Arbor.

The funeral of the late Joseph L. Postles will be held from the residence on Hamilton street tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock.

Bert Wint of Railroad street died Saturday, aged 27 years. He was a veteran of the Spanish American War and his health began to fail soon after his return from Cuba. He went to Arizona for a time, but was not benefited. He leaves a mother, two sisters, Mrs. F. E. Spoffard of Manchester and Miss Rose Wint of this city and a brother, Frank, also of Ypsilanti. Funeral services were held at St. John's Church this morning, the Spanish American War Veterans attending in a body.

1906/01/31
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier Register

[column]
Pg.8

Ypsilanti Brevities
[From Wednesday's Daily]

The remains of Norman Denton who was killed in the Grand Trunk yards at Detroit, were brought here this morning for interment. Funeral services were held at the chapel, Rev. Eugene Allen officiating.

Cicero Millington, a former well known Ypsilantian, is dead at the home of his daughter Mrs. A.F. Wilcox of Royal Oak. Mr. Millington's first wife was a sister of Hiram Camp and the second Dolissa Showerman, both of whom have passed away. The remains will be brought here tomorrow for burial beside his wives.

1906/02/02
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[article]
Pg.

RECORD NOT RETURNED TO WAYNE COUNTY CLERK
Mrs. H. E. Dickinson of Ypsilanti was looking over the papers of her dead father Monday morning when she came across the record of a marriage that had never been returned to the Wayne county clerk's office as required by law. It was a certification that on Feb. 9, 1857, Thomas C. Gardner had married Daniel Dugan of Trenton to Adelaide C. Pennock of Brownstown. The bridegroom was 22 years of age and bride 20.

1906/02/07
Monday

Ann Arbor
Courier

[article]
Pg.1

HAD FEET FROZEN
WILL LOSE THEM
A Dexter Township Farmer's Son Fell From Wagon and Lay all Night in the Snow

A Washtenaw county man had both feet frozen so that they will have to be amputated in the first zero weather of the year. William Connors, of Dexter township, son of J. H. Connors, left Pinckney at half past seven Thursday evening for his home, four miles south of that village. When about half way home he fell from his buggy and lay all night in the snow while the thermometer went down to about eight degrees below zero at the point where he fell. He had been drinking heavily and was helpless. Both his feet were frozen solid so that amputation is necessary. What saved his life, probably, is the fact the the blankets fell out over him, although not over his feet. Connors is about twenty-one years and is a farmer's son.

1906/02/07
Monday

Ann Arbor
Courier

[article]
Pg.1

KILLED IN AN ELEVATOR
GARRET S. BROWN
Ann Arbor Man Caught in an Elevator at Los Angeles, California and Died Two Days Later
[From Friday's Daily]

Garrett S. Brown of 708 South State street died in a hospital at Los Angeles, California, yesterday of injuries received in an elevator accident in that city two days before. His wife was informed of the fact that he was in the hospital two days ago and yesterday afternoon received a telegram announcing his death. The particulars of the accident have not yet reached here.

Mr. Brown moved here last fall from Detroit, where he had been a prominent business man. He had been president of the Michigan Club and prominent in politics. He left here about three months ago for a business trip to California. He was about fifty-eight years of age. He leaves a wife, a daughter, Mrs. Clara B. Perkins, who lives with her mother at 708 South State Street, and a son who is a dentist in Indiana.

The remains will be brought to Detroit for burial.

1906/02/09
Friday

The Argus-
Democrat
[article]

A FATAL ACCIDENT
Garrett S. Brown Killed at Los Angeles
TERRIBLY CRUSHED
In Elevator--Taken to Hospital and Died Short Time Later

Garrett S. Brown, a traveling salesman, whose home is in this city, was crushed and fatally injured last week in an elevator accident in Los Angeles, Cal. He was taken to a hospital and died Thursday. He has a wife and daughter residing at 708 South State street. The body was brought to Detroit for burial. He was formerly a resident of that city and in business there for twenty five years.

1906/02/09
Friday

The Argus-
Democrat
[article]

FORMER ANN ARBORITE DIED IN WISCONSIN
Mrs. Amelia Durrill Irland, former Ann Arbor resident, died at Oconomowoc, Wis. at the age of 75 years. The body was brought to Adrian for burial. Mrs. Irland is survived by four children, Frederic, a reporter in the house of representatives; Mrs. Ira Deddow, whose husband is principal of the preparatory department of Olivet college and Frank and Miss Helen Irland, of Oconomowoc.

1906/02/09
Friday

The Argus-
Democrat
[obituary]

OBITUARY
Mr. Elisha C. Foster of 703 Miner street died Monday aged 43 years. The funeral took place Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 from the residence. Burial at Forest Hill.

1906/02/16
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[obituary]
Pg.

OBITUARY
Mrs. Sarah White of 509 N. Ashley street died very suddenly Saturday, aged 75 years. The funeral was held from the residence Monday afteroon at two o'clock. Interment at Forest Hill Cemetery.

1906/02/16
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[article]
Pg.

MISS HULDAH MAIER DIED VERY SUDDENLY
Miss Huldah Maier, daughter of Mrs. Rose Maier of 418 North State street, died Wednesday afternoon in Harper hospital, Detroit. The remains were brought to her home in Ann Arbor. The funeral will be held Friday morning at 8 o'clock, from the residence. Burial at Grand Ledge, Michigan.

1906/02/16
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[column]
Pg.

Miss Margaret Fritz and Mr. Adam Schroen of this city, were married Wednesday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock, by Rev. Father Taylor, at the parsonage. The bride and groom were attended by Miss Julia Fritz, sister of the bride and Mr. Jacob Schroen, brother of the groom. Miss Fritz has lived in Ann Arbor some years, residing at W. W. Tuttle's on State street. Mr. Schroen has for the past year clerked in the store. They will make their home in Ann Arbor for the present.

1906/02/16
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[column]
Pg.

THE ARGUS DID IT
Story of Fred Campbell Was Read in Maine
HIS PARENTS SAW IT
Found That They Were Heirs to His Property and Have Put in Claims.

Attorney Frank Stivers appeared in probate court yesterday with an affidavit to the effect that Charles A. Bryant and wife of Maine are the parents of the late Fred Campbell, of Sharon. Campbell died without known heirs and the state of Michigan put in a claim for the property. It developed that Campbell was an adopted son of a Jackson man and had taken his name and that he was going under an assumed name when he came to Michigan from the east. Such facts of the case as were known to the Washtenaw authorities were given in the Argus and a copy of the paper found its way ot Maine, and fell into the hands of a man who happened to know all about the case. He communicated to Charles Bryant and his divorced wife, the parents of the former Sharon resident and they got in touch with Attorney Stivers.

The cases seems to be proven and the parents will undoubtedly get their son's property. The son lived with another family for a while in the east and took their name. When he came to Michigan he was adopted by a man named Campbell and assumed the name of his foster-father and later inherited his property by will.

1906/02/16
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus Democrat

[column]
Pg.

SHERIFF NEWTON AFTER MURDERER
Sheriff Newton has received word from Howell to be on the look out for Elmer Hildebrand, of that place, who is believed to be the murderer of G. F. Sibell, who was shot Wednesday night. Sibell was found dying on the street from a bullet wound.

The Washtenaw deputies have all been notified of the crime by Sheriff Newton and have been odered to keep a lookout for the suspect. Hildebrand is described as being short, thickset, with sandy mustache. He weighs about 140 pounds and is stoop-shouldered.

A man named Hildebrand recently served a term in the Washtenaw jail and Deputy Feguson says he answers the description of the murder suspect.

ca 1906/04/27
Friday

unidentified
clipping

BIOGRAPHY
Maria Jane Peebles was born in Salem, Was
[h]tenaw county, Michigan, May 15, 1833. She passed away, Sunday morning, April 27, at her late home six miles north of Williamston. She was married to the late Chas. T. Murray of Ann Arbor, Washtenaw county, in the year 1853, and he preceded her in death six years ago. They were early pioneer settlers.

To them were born ten children, five of whom are now living and five dead. Those left to mourn the loss of a mother are Hurbert F. Murray of Lansing, Bert, Vern and Clayton and Mrs. J. G. Bartow of Williamston; beside these, she leaves one brother and two sisters, Rev. David Peebles of California, Mrs. Jas. Levan of Plymouth, and Mrs. Jas. Coy of Alma. The two sisters reached her bed side just before she passed away.

She was converted at the age of 15 years and united with the Peebles Congregational church, her home church from childhood. She was a true christian, living up to the faith and light that was given her. Her favorite funeral hymn was "Looking this way." She was highly respected and liked by everyone. Her funeral was held at the residence Tuesday, April 29, at 10:30 a.m., Rev. Curts officiating. Burial in Summit cemetery.

[Contributed by Charla Kurtz, charlakurtz (at) yahoo.com, The Lyke and Livingston Families]

ca 1909/02/14
Sunday

unidentified
clipping

Hannah Jane McCormick was born March 21, 1824, and died February 14, 1909. She was the second child of John and Rachel McCormick and was one of a family of 11 children, two of whom survive her. January 25, 1844, she was married to Ambrose Murray of Superior. Eight children were born to them, six of whom are living, John and Frank Murray of Salem, Mrs. L. W. (Harrison) of Ann Arbor, Woodward Murray of Plymouth, and Mrs. E. E. Rector of Harrison of Milbrook, James Murray Toledo. July 23, 1887, Mr. Murray died; since that time she had lived on her farm in Superior until about two years ago, when she came to live with her son Frank, at whose home she died. Mrs. Mruray [sic] had been blind for nearly eight years. About 18 months ago she suffered a paralytic stroke and since that time had ben [sic] confined to her bed. She was a very patient sufferer and will be greatly missed by a large circle of friends.
[Contributed by Charla Kurtz, charlakurtz (at) yahoo.com, The Lyke and Livingston Families]

1909/02/15
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[column]
Pg.4

George Millen is spending the day in Detroit.
[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

1909/02/19
Friday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.8

DR. ANGELL IS ONLY MAN LIVING WHO HAS BEEN PRESIDENT OF MICHIGAN

Dr. James Burrill Angell is the only man living who has been president of the University of Michigan, although Dean Harry B. Hutchins, of the law department, enjoys the honor of having been acting president of the University during Dr. Angell's absence as U. S. ambassador and plenipotentiary extraordinary to Turkey. The university has had but a short roll of presidents as follows:
 Rev. Henry Philip Tappan, D.D., LL.D., 1852-63.
 Rev. Erastus Otis Haven, D.D., LL.D., 1863-69.
 James Burrill Angell, LL.D., 1871-1909.

To these may be added the name of Henry Simmons Frieze, LL.D., acting president 1869-71, during the interregnum following Dr. Haven's resignation, and again from 1880-82, during Dr. Angell's absence as U. S. minister to China. Dr. Tappan lived 18 years after his resignation of the presidency, dying at Vevay, Switzerland, November 15, 1881. Dr. Haven's death preceded Dr. Tappan's by less than three months, and he died in Salem, Ore., August 2, 1881.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1909/02/19
Friday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.8

OLD RECORDS TELL OF FIRST CASE TRIED IN THIS COUNTY

One of the most interesting books in the county clerk's office is the Miscellaneous Records of Washtenaw County, 1827.

It contains the journal of the first court which ever sat in Ann Arbor, when Michigan was still a territory. The court convened at the house of Erastus Priest and the only case tried at the first term of court was against the man in whose house the court was held. The name of the city of Ann Arbor is spelled throughout the record Ann Arbour. Honorable Samuel W. Dexter, of anti-Masonic fame, presided and was dignified with the imposing title of chief justice. Twenty-two grand jurors including E. W. Rumsey, one of the first settlers of Ann Arbor, returned a true bill against Priest for selling liquor without a license. A petit jury of 12 including Eldridge Gee, the first settler to the county, heard the case, and after being out two hours returned a verdict of not guilty. Daniel Brown was Priest's sole witness, and at the next ses
[si]on of the court Daniel Brown reappeared as defendant in the case of the United States of America vs. Daniel Brown and after two trials was found guilty and fined $25. The first jury not agreeing was sent out again and finally again reported late in the evening that it was unable to agree. The jurors were then discharged as it was found that there was but 11 of them in the words of the record, "David Scott having left the jury room without leave." David Scott was brought before the court for contempt next day but what was done with him has been very carefully erased from the record.

The first business of the court was the granting of licenses to keep a tavern. John Allen, Nathan Thomas and Benjamin F. Woodruff were granted licenses for such a purpose, and to retail "strong or spiritous liquors." Allen will be remembered as the founder of Ann Arbor and Woodruff as the first settler near Ypsilanti and the first high sheriff of the county.

"The Rev. William Paige," says the record, "made application through his attorney for a license to celebrate the rites of matrimony. After producing his credentials, the court being satisfied, ordered said license."

There was trouble in locally trying the first civil suit ever tried in Washtenaw county. This suit was tried in the June term, 1827, and was entitled "Levi Hiscock vs. Daniel Brown." The jury was given permission to bring in a sealed verdict by consent of the parties. The record continues, "The jury empaneled in the case came in as ordered with a sealed verdict, to wit, 'no partnership' and was dismissed. Whereupon the material matter not being tryed the court ordered a new jury empaneled." The second jury brought in a verdict of $92.72 for the plaintiff. The plaintiff was the uncle of President Charles E. Hiscock of the Ann Arbor Savings bank and the defendant was the father of Mrs. Martha M. Wilder of Kingsley street.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1909/12/28
Tuesday

Daily Times
News

(Ann Arbor)
[article]
Pg.1

WELL KNOWN MAN DIED HERE TODAY AFTER LONG LIFE
John Goetz Passed Away at Ripe Old Age at His Home on Main Street.

John Goetz, for over 60 years a resident of this city and for many years a prominent business man, died this morning at 2 o'clock at his residence, 423 South Main street.

Mr. Goetz was born in Wuerttemberg, Germany, February 16, 1828, and came to Ann Arbor in 1847, engaging in the grocery business at 221 South Main street. He retired from active work 15 years ago, his son, William still continuing to conduct the business. He is survived by a widow, his son and three daughters, Miss Bertha at home, Mrs. J.C. Hildner and Mrs. Fred Chapin both of this city. For many years Mr. Goetz was a member of Bethlehem church, and its pastor, Rev. S. A. John, will conduct the funeral services, which will be held Thursday at 1:30 at the residence and at 2 o'clock at the church. The burial will be in Bethlehem cemetery.

1909/12/28
Tuesday

Daily Times
News

(Ann Arbor)
[article]
Pg.1

APOPLEXY IS CAUSE OF DEATH
Mrs. Margaret Finnegan Found Unconscious By Her Sister.
Was Well Known Woman Who Had Lived Here Many Years.

Mrs. Margaret Finnegan, for 20 years a resident of this city and well known for her many deeds of charity, died last evening at 6 o'clock of apoplexy at her home, 502 East Kingsley street, after an illness of only about 12 hours.

Mrs. Finnegan had been in poor health for three or four years, but on Sunday was able to attend church services and had appeared to be unusually well. She went to bed Sunday evening and it was not until 6 o'clock the next morning that her sister, Miss Sarah Smith, with whom she lived went into her bedroom to find her unconscious on the floor. She had gotten out of bed and tried to dress herself, but had been stricken by apoplexy. She did not regain consciousness. Mrs. Finnegan was born in Northfield 76 years ago, and lived there until she came to this city 20 years ago. Three sisters survive her, Mrs. Lawrence O'Toole, Mrs. Henry Masten, and Miss Smith. Her nephew William Finnegan of Detroit, she had adopted as a child and brought him up and educated him. He is now an electrician at London, Can., [Ontario, Canada] and is in the city for the funeral.

Services will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Thomas' Catholic church and the burial will be in St. Thomas' cemetery.

This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.