1920-1929 Newspaper Notices

Obituaries, Deaths, Marriages, Birthdays, and Notices
from Washtenaw County Newspapers
1920-1929


Compiled by Bobbie Snow and Contributors
 
1840s | 1850s | 1860s | 1870s | 1880s | 1890s | 1900s
1910s | 1920s | 1930+ | ???? | Index A-L | Index M-Z
Introduction | Terms, Titles, & Abbreviations | Submit News Item

 
This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.

Date/Day
YYYY/MM/DD

Newspaper/
Source Type

Text

1921/07/04
Monday

Daily Times
News

(Ann Arbor)
[obituary]
Pg.?

MISS ANN BOYLE DIES AT HOME AT AGE OF 81 YEARS

Miss Ann Boyle died at her home, 513 North Division street, Sunday morning, after a short illness. She was 81 years of age, and a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Boyle, who were pioneers of Washtenaw county. Miss Boyle was born at Northfield, coming to this city with her sister Norah 25 years ago. The two sisters lived together in the home on North Division street until four years ago when Miss Norah died. Since that time Miss Ann has lived alone. Miss Boyle is survived by four nephews and five nieces. Funeral services for her will be held at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning in St. Thomas church. Interment will be made in St. Patrick's cemetery at Northfield.

[Contributed by Mary Ferguson, mjfergus (at) tir.com]

1923/09/13
Thursday

Ann Arbor
News

[obituary]
Pg.?

John H. Lawton

John H. Lawton, 74 of Northfield township died shortly after 9 o'clock this morning in a local hospital. He is survived by one son John R. Lawton of Chesaning. Funeral services will be held at St. Patricks church, Northfield, at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning. Burial will be in Northfield cemetery.

[Contributed by Ann Wright, [wrights@ atl.mediaone.net, broken 3-8-15], Comment: John Lawton is my great-grandfather.]

1926/03/08
Monday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[article]
Pg.3

FORMER RESIDENT OF ANN ARBOR IS DEAD
Mrs. Giles Lewis, former Ann Arbor resident, died Saturday in Chicago. She was a sister of Charles S. Millen and was born and educated in this city. She married I. Giles Lewis, a graduate of the University, and moved to Chicago. Mr. Lewis lived in Chicago all his life, being engaged in the wholesale drug business. He died in 1918.

The body was brought to Ann Arbor Sunday and private funeral services will be held at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon at Mr. Millen's residence. Rev. Henry Lewis will officiate and burial will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[column]
Pg.1

Introducing —-
Miss Jennie Buell,
Grange official.

Miss Buell was born at Little Prairie Ronde, Cass county, Michigan. She is a graduate of Decatur high school and attended Michigan State Normal college at Ypsilanti.

Miss Buell for many years has been actively associated with Michigan grange work. Beginning as assitant editor of the state grange paper, she later became secretary and still later was lecturer of the state grange organization. During this time, she also held the offices of instructor of Ypsilanti grange and lecturer of Washtenaw County Pomona grange.

At present, Miss Buell is connected with the extension division of Michigan State college as a specialist in continuing education. She also is master of Washtenaw Pomona grange.

Miss Buell is keenly interested in public affairs and rural home environment.

She resides at 2013 Washtenaw-av.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

Lewis Lutz

Lewis Lutz, 57, husband of Mrs. Elizabeth Lutz, died Thursday at his home in Ann Arbor township after a lingering illness.

He is survived by the widow and three brothers, Fred and Simon of Ann Arbor and William of Adrian.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon at the residence. Rev. G. A. Newman will officiate. Interment will be in Bethlehem cemetery.

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

Philip Schweinfurth
(Special to The Times News)

Chelsea, April 30.—-Philip Schweinfurth, 76, died Thursday at his home in Sylvan township. He was born April 2, 1850 at Marion, O., and was married Dec. 28, 1874, to Miss Louise Notten. They had made their home for the past 50 years on the farm in Sylvan township, where he died.

He is survived by his widow; three sons, Floyd of Eaton Rapids, Elmer of Lansing and Albert at home; two daughters, Mrs. Herman Fahrner of Sylvan township and Mrs. Carl Mast of Chelsea; three sisters, Mrs. Albert Taft of Denver, Mrs. Elizabeth Beuter of Jackson and Mrs. Henry Notten of Sylvan township and a brother, Nicholas of Michigan Center.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon at Salem Methodist church. Francisco. Rev. Fred Ross will officiate. Interment will be in Salem cemetery.

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

Funeral Services Held
(Special to The Times News)

Tecumseh, April 30.—-Funeral services for John Pentecost, 71, who died Monday afternoon following a two-year illness, were held Thursday afternoon at the residence on North Van Buren-st. Rev. H. J. B. Marsh officiated. Interment was in Brookside cemetery.

Mrs.
[sic] Pentecost was born March 5, 1855, in Franklin township, and had made his home in Tecumseh since 1907. He is survived by the widow and two sisters, Mrs. Charles Baker of Jackson and Miss Anna Pentecost of Tipton.

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

Mrs. Sarah Martin.
(Special to The Times News)

Pinckney, April 30.—-Mrs. Sarah Martin, 84, died this morning at her home in Pinckney, where she has lived most of her life since leaving her birthplace in Vermont.

She is survived by four daughters, Miss Blanch Martin and Mrs. Villa Richard of Pinckney, Mrs. Roy Peeple of Manistee and Mrs. Charles Eaman, of Garden City, Kan., and a son, Lyle, of Detroit.

Funeral arrangements are not complete.

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[column]
Pg.21

MRS. CONRAD KRAMER IS CLAIMED BY DEATH

Ypsilanti, April 30.—-Mrs. Conrad Kramer, 49, died Thursday afternoon at her home on Miles-st. following an illness of two years. She was born in Carleton and lived in Stockbridge. Eight years ago she came to Ypsilanti where she has since made her home. She is survived by her mother, Mrs. Agnes Livernois, her husband and five children, Effner, Arthur, Frank, Mary and Agnes and several brothers and sisters.

Funeral arrangements have not been complete
[d].

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[column]
Pg.21

MRS. C.W. WARBOY DIES IN YPSILANTI

Ypsilanti, April 30.—-Mrs. C. W. Warboy, 43, died this morning at her home on Davis-st. following a three week's illness. She is survived by the widower and four daughters, Mrs. Roy Smith and Mrs. Paul Max of this city, Mrs. Clarence Vedder of Whitaker and Mrs. Oscar Edwards of St. Lawrence. She lived in Ypsilanti for the past 17 years. Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

1926/04/30
Friday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[column]
Pg.21

PRIVATE SERVICES TO BE HELD AT YPSILANTI

Ypsilanti, April 30.—-Private funeral services for Herman Rhoem will be held at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon from the Wallace Undertaking parlors. Interment will be in Highland cemetery.

1926/05/01
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Argus

[death column]
Pg.3

Fred Aulls

Bridgewater, May 1.—-Fred Aulls, 61 died Friday afternoon at the home of his brother, Clarence Aulls, at Manchester, where he has been since Sunday. Mr. Aulls always had been a resident of Bridgewater. He had been ill for several months.

He is survived by a sister, Mrs. Bessie Urquehart of Detroit and his brother, Clarence.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

1926/05/04
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

Mrs. Duncan L. McDonald

Mrs. Duncan L. McDonald, a graduate of University of Michigan who for two years had been postmaster at Candle, Alaska, died recently at Candle. She formerly was Miss Frances Bishop, cousin of Mrs. W. W. Sleator of 2503 Geddes-av. and a niece of Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Bishop of Geddes road.

The widower, Duncan L. McDonald, pioneer Alaskan miner, has arrived in Nome, Alaska, with the body, after travelling 200 miles from Candle by dog team. The body is to be taken to Hillsdale, the home of relatives.

1926/05/04
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

George J. Knapp
(Special to The Times News)

Chelsea, May 4.—-George J. Knapp, 82, Civil war veteran, died suddenly Monday at Chelsea. He was born Sept. 2, 1844, at Wurttemberg, Germany, coming to the United States in 1858. He enlisted April 4, 1865 at Chicago, with Co. F, Ninth Regiment Volunteer cavalry. He received his discharge Oct. 31, 1865. He was a member of Hancock chapter, G.A.R., of Henderson, Minn. He was married June 15, 1873, to Miss Bertha Horn at Lake Geneva, Wis.

Until 25 years ago, he had conducted a general store in Minnesota. Retiring from business, Mr. And Mrs. Knapp went to Chicago, where they resided until about five years ago, when they came to Chelsea.

He is survived by the widow, a daughter, Mrs. Carl F. Braun of Ann Arbor and a grandson, Roger Braun of Ann Arbor.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon at the residence on McKinley-st. Rev. P. H. Grabowski will officiate. Interment will be in Ann Arbor.

1926/05/04
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

Funeral Services Are Held.

Short funeral services for Miss Jessie Lane Craig, 27, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Craig of 212 Fourteenth-st., who died Monday, were held Monday at Graham's funeral parlors. The body was taken to Vandalia, where funeral services will be held Wednesday. Interment will be in the cemetery at Vandalia.

Miss Craig was born in Ann Arbor and attended the public schools of this city, being graduated from Ann Arbor High school. She was graduated from University of Michigan in 1923. She was a member of the faculty of the college at Tuskegee, Ala., teaching French and Spanish there for a year, giving up the work because of failing health.

She is survived by her parents, a sister, Mrs. E. S. Carter of Battle Creek, two nieces and two nephews.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1926/05/04
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[death column]
Pg.3

Funeral Services Wednesday
(Special to The Times News)

Chelsea, May 4.—-Funeral services for Mrs. Abner B. Spencer, who died Sunday in Ann Arbor hospital, will be held at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Storn of Chelsea. Rev. E. L. Sutherland will officiate. Interment will be in Maple Grove cemetery, Sylvan Center.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1926/10/05
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[article]
Pg.1

DEATH TAKES C. S. MILLEN
Local Merchant Dies Suddenly at Home; Was Life-long Resident

Charles S. Millen for more than 60 years a merchant in Ann Arbor, died suddenly at his home at 815 Lawrence-st. Mr. Millen had been in poor health since last summer, but had been active in his business up to the time of his death. He had spent Monday at his store and was about to leave for his duties there, this morning, when he passed away.

Mr. Millen was a life-long resident of this city, and was graduated from Ann Arbor High school. He alwo was graduated from Poughkeepsie Business college, New York. Returning to Ann Arbor, he entered the employ of his father, Cha
[u]ncey H. Millen, dry goods merchant. He also was employed for several years by the firm of Schairer & Millen. His store had been located at 111 South Main-st. for the past 21 years.

He was an active Mason, for many years being both a member of the Shriners and Ann Arbor Commandery, No. 13, K. T.
[Knights Templar] He also had held all of the Masonic offices. Mr. Millen was a member of Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce and several retail drygoods dealers' organizations as well as the local Episcopal church.

He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Lizzie Millen, and a son, Dewitt C. Millen of Ann Arbor. Another son, Dr. C. S. Millen died about 15 years ago.

Funeral arrangements have not been completed.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

1926/10/06
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[article]
Pg.1

MILLEN SERVICES TO BE THURSDAY
Burial in Forest Hill Cemetery to Follow Church Ceremony

Funeral service for the late Charles S. Millen will be held at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon at St. Andrew's Episcopal church. Rev. Henry Lewis and Rev. Henry Tatlock will officiate. Interment will be in Forest Hill cemetery. The body will lie in state from 7 to 10 o'clock this evening at the residence, 815 East Lawrence-st.

Active pall-bearers will be: Adolph Diehl, Harry Nichols, Fred Stowe, George E. Apfel, James Murnan, and Don M. S. McIntyre.

Honorary pall-bearers include: Dr. Hugh Beeke, C. B. Coe, Prof. William Butts, Dr. G. G. Alway, George Millen, Herbert Williams, Walter Mack, Frank DeVine, Paul Proud, Levi D. Wines, Dr. Dean W. Myers, Andrew Tanner, Michael Fritz, Jesse Booth, Allen Stanchfield, Charles J. Hutzel, William L. Walz, Rice Beal, George K. Vandawarker, Bert Schumacher, Philip Schumaker, Evart H. Scott, Dr. E. C. Ganzhorn, and Dr. W. H. Jackson.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

1926/10/07
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Times News

[article]
Pg.3

SIXTY YEARS IN BUSINESS
Death of Charles S. Millen, after an active business career covering more than 60 years, is an event of unusual sadness to the community.

Not many men have a record of that length in any community. Perhaps Ann Arbor has more veterans than the average city, because it is old and there are many business establishments here of long standing which have remained in the families of the founders for a number of generations. Nevertheless, Mr. Millen's life as a merchant is outstanding among those veterans. And it is noteworthy that he remained in direct touch with his business until the last, going regularly to work, reluctant to lay down the reigns.

It is tragic when these veterans pass, because they are in effect public institutions around which are woven public traditions. Their lives and civic history cannot be disassociated. Indeed, if Mr. Millen had kept a day-by-day record of his business career, it would serve as a chronicle of Ann Arbor's growth for the past half century.

It is something to have served the same public, in any worthwhile capacity, for so long a time. Business truly must be fascinating to hold a lure that neither the passage of time nor physical indisposition can overcome. And there must be much satisfaction for the family, even in the midst of their sorrow, to know that this genial old gentleman who had to say goodby never was content to assume the role of an onlooker but remained at all times, until the final summons that could not be ignored, an active part of the commercial life of the city, personifying the spirit that makes for civic growth and uplift.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

1928/10/05
Friday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.3

64TH BIRTHDAY IS CELEBRATED

Pinckney, Oct. 5 —-Bert Van Blaricum was most delightfully surprised on his sixty-fourth birthday anniversary when he was visited by 35 relatives from Detroit, Howell, Fenton, Flint and Oxford. A fine dinner was served, the crowning feature being a birthday cake with lighted tapers. Mr. Van Blaricum received many gifts.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for N. Van Blaricum]

ca 1928/10/05
Friday

unidentified
clipping

MRS. WM. LYKE OF FRAINS LAKE DEAD; LEAVES 5 CHILDREN
Well Known Lady Passes Away on Farm Where She Was Born in 1858

Frains Lake, October 5 —-Mrs. Carrie Lyke, 70, wife of William Lyke, well known resident of Frains Lake passed away on Monday at the home, following an illness of the past eight months. The funeral was held on Wednesday afternoon from the late residence with interment in Pray cemetery.

She was the eldest child of Ford and Chloe (Whelock) Packard and was born August 31, 1858 on the farm where she died. Her early life was spent here where she grew to young womanhood and was married to W. J. Lyke, who survives, also five children, T. W. Lyke, George Lyke and Mrs. Mabel Sherwood of this place, Glen Lyke of Salem, and Roy Lyke of Plymouth, nine grandchildren and a sister, Mrs. Elizabeth Gale, Plymouth.

[Contributed by Charla Kurtz, charlakurtz (at) yahoo.com, The Lyke and Livingston Families]

1928/10/08
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.1

BANK ORGANIZED IN 1882; ONE ORIGINAL DIRECTOR ON BOARD
Has Occupied Present Site Since Establishment; Only Two Presidents Have Served Institution in 46 Years

The third of the four present banks in Ann Arbor to be organized and nearing completion of a half century of public service to this community, the history of the Farmers & Mechanics Bank is a history of progress.

Two presidents and five vice presidents have served this institution during the 46 years of its existence. This, it is believed, is a record in Ann Arbor banks for the few changes in head officers.

Late in the year 1881, or early in 1882, Joseph T. Jacobs, who operated a tailor shop on the southeast corner of Main and Washington streets, conceived the idea of establishing another bank in the city, according to O. W. Stephenson, Ann Arbor historian and author of "Ann Arbor, the First Hundred Years."

"He talked over the project with Reuben Kempf, John Keck, and Harvey Cornwell, convincing them of the business possibilities of the proposed venture," Prof. Stevenson writes in his volume. "These men fell in with his idea and plans for the sale of stock and for organizing the bank were made. Stock to the amount of $50,000 was sold, and on the last Monday in September, 1882, the organization was completed.

 
Kempf First President

"The elected officers were: President, Reuben Kempf; vice president, Edward Duffy and cashier, William A. Tolchard. The new bank was to be known as the Farmers' and Mechanics' bank, its doors on the southeast corner of Main and Huron streets, being opend for the first time, March 1, 1883."

The original board of directors as recalled by D. F. Schairer of this city, the only member still living, included William Stevens, Rueben Kempf, Edward Duffy, Ambrose Kearney, Joseph Jacobs, John Burg, Harvey Cornwell and W. A. Tolchard.

Mr. Tolchard served as cashier of the bank until 1888, when he was succeeded by Fred H. Belser, who remained for 20 years and was followed in 1908 by Herbert A. Williams. Mr. Kempf, the first president, died in 1912 after having held the position 17 years. He was succeeded the same year by Mr. Williams, who continued to hold that office.

Maj. William Stevens followed Mr. Duffey
[sic] as vice president, and was succeeded by Charles E. Green and Horace Prettyman, who preceded Junius E. Beal, the present vice president. Fred T. Stowe, who has been connected with the down town bank for 27 years, was named cashier in 1912.
 
Capital Involved

The prosperity of the financial activites of the bank is indicative of its progress. Between 1883 and 1895, the stock, surplus and undivided profits rose to $81,000; in 1905, it had mounted to $114,000; in 1915, it had reached $270,000; and by July 1, 1925, it totaled $360,000; with records Oct. 10, 1927, showing the total stock, surplus and undivided profits as $416,534.

In March, 1912, the capital was increased by a stock dividend to $100,000; on July 1, 1915, it was increased to $150,000 by the sale of stock at $175 per share to 90 persons. This last increase was made in 1920 by means of a stock dividend, when the capitalization was raised to $200,000, at which figure it still remains.

The State St. branch of the Farmers & Mechanics bank was established in September, 1915. Max E. Williams, son of the president of the bank, was placed in charge of the branch June 1, 1925. The main branch of the bank has occupied its present site since its organization, with the exception of intervals when remodeling or re-construction was in progress.

A frame structure housed the bank from 1883 to 1901, when a brick building replaced it. This was remodeled in 1920, with plans for the present building announced shortly after the former structure was demolished in August, 1937.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1928/10/08
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.14

MANY FIELDS REPRESENTED BY DIRECTORS
D. F. Schairer Among Organizers of F. & M. Institution


[Photographs of the 14 members of the board appear with this article under the caption "These Men Guide Policies of Bank Which Opened New Building Today": H. A. WILLIAMS, President; JUNIUS E. BEAL, Vice President; GEORGE W. MILLEN, Vice President; FRED T. STOWE, Cashier; C. C. FREEMAN, Director; JAMES FOSTER, Director; D. F. SCHAIRER, Director; GEORGE J. BURKE, Counsel, B. F. SCHUMACHER, Director, SHIRLEY W. SMITH, Director, CHARLES A. SINK, Director, G. A. VANDAWARKER, Director; W. W. WADHAMS, Director; H. J. ABBOTT, Director. - Photographs by Will Armstrong. - Randall Studio.]

A cross section of the business and professional life of Ann Arbor is revealed in the membership of the board of directors of the Farmers & Mechanics bank, various lines of endeavor being represented by the 14 men who direct the activities of this institution.

D. F. Schairer, the oldest member of the board and the only living original director, is a retired merchant. He formerly was associated in business with the late C. H. Millen to whom he sold out when their store changed locations on Main St. Incidentally, it was for Mr. Schairer that Fred T. Stowe, cashier of the bank, worked when he first came to Ann Arbor.

Horatio J. Abbott, another member of the board, is a former postmaster and at the present time is president of the Abbott Gasoline Co., a concern which he organized. Junius E. Beal, besides being a regent of the University of Michigan, is a capitalist, and is identified with many local enterprises.

 
Attorney on Board

George J. Burke, another director, is the junior member of the law firm of Cavanaugh & Burke and has a wide reputation as a practicing attorney. George W. Millen is another capitalist, his interests including real estate, manufacturing enterprises and other lines of endeavor.

B. F. Schumacher is a member of the Schumacher Hardware Co. and also of the plumbing and heating firm of Schumacher & Backus. James Foster is the owner of Foster's Art shop and C. O. Freeman is the proprietor of the Freeman boarding house.

The University is represented on the board by Shirley W. Smith, secretary of this institution, and the field of music has a representative in Charles A. Sink, president of University School of Music. George A. Vandawarker also is a former postmaster and for several years has been manager of the Ann Arbor water board. W. W. Wadhams is a well-known clothier, being of the firm of Wadhams & Co.

Mr. Stowe and Herbert A. Williams, president of the Farmers & Mechanics bank, are the other two members of the board, Mr. Williams being its chairman.

 
Interested in Politics

The directors might also be said to be representative of various phases of political life, many of its members being or having been holders of political offices.

As mentioned, Mr. Abbott and Mr. Vandawarker are former postmasters. Mr Aboott, at present chairman of the Democratic state central committee, also held the office of registe
[r] of deeds and Mr. Vandawarker is a former city clerk and city treasurer.

George J. Burke has been prosecutor of Washtenaw and several times has been honored by his political party with the nominations for attorney general and justice of the supreme court. C. C. Freeman is a former alderman. Charles A. Sink has served in various city positions, as state representative and at the present time is a state senator. Mr. Schumacher is an indefatigable worker for the Democratic city committee, of which he is treasurer. Mr. Beal also has an elective office as a regent and Mr. Millen has served on the state conservation commission.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1928/10/08
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.16,20

First Bank Started in Ann Arbor 93 Years Ago

Ann Arbor banking history as old or nearly as old as the city itself, officially dates back to 1835, when the first bank, known as the Bank of Washtenaw, was established.

Wildcat banking, the origin of which is credited to two Scio township men, was the principal type of banking in Ann Arbor as well as the entire county, previous to 1833, when the principal business men of the village desiring to stablize the financial condition here, petitioned the legislature for authority to establish a bank.

Those who signed this petition during the winter of 1833-34, included Volney Chapin, John Allen, E. W. Morgan, James Kingsley, James Turner Allen, Edward Clark, Esek Pray, Solon Cook, Israel Branch, Chauncey S. Goodrich, William R. Thompson, Asa L. Smith, Cyrus Beckwith, Sylvester Knight, Henry Welch, Daniel Brown and a number of others.

Permission to establish the bank was given Feb. 22, 1834. The capital stock was fixed at $100,000 and shares were to be sold at $50 each. In the spring of 1835, the bank was formally organized with seven directors.

 
Started in Business

Of this bank and its early history, one local historian writes, "At a meeting in the courthouse July 8, the banking rooms were located in the two west rooms of the old Chapin home on the northeast corner of Fourth Ave. and Ann St., and the business of putting the rooms in order was begun. By June 1, all the stock had been purchased, nearly all of it having been taken by people living in or near the village, and the institution began business under the name of the Bank of Washtenaw.

"E. W. Morgan was the first cashier and most of the time handled all of the dealings of the bank. Soon the bulk of the stock was held by William S. Maynard, Julia G. Maynard, Samuel D. Dexter, Onley Hawkins, Samuel Denton and a few of their friends. That first year an assessment of $5 a share on the capital stock was made, which had to be paid on or before Sept. 28. The affairs of the bank went from bad to worse, insufficient security and too much paper money spelling its doom. It managed to keep open until the summer of 1846, when it was forced to close its doors.

"The downfall of the Bank of Washtenaw was due also to an over liberal policy in the matter of loans and collections. From 1835 to 1845, it became increasingly difficult for the bank to back its notes with 'hard money,' and the time came when these notes would no longer pass. Under the circumstances there was nothing left to do but meet the crash.

 
Sold at Auction

"On May 25, 1846, therefore, notice was given 'that by virtue of the court of chancery, the assets of the Bank of Washtenaw will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder, at the Court House in the village of Ann Arbor, on the eleventh day of July next at two o'clock p.m. on that day. James Kingsley, receiver of said bank." It was in 1847 that the property came into Volney Chapin's possession. This same property, many years later became known as the Arlington hotel and still later the Chamber of Commerce."

Continuing the history of banking, Prof. O. W. Stephenson, in his recent book "Ann Arbor, the First Hundred Years," writes: "For many years after the Bank of Washtenaw went out of existence Ann Arbor had no legally incorporated bank. Loaning money was carried on by individuals, interest charges were very high, and loans were extended only on the very best security. Taking advantage of the situation, Donald McIntyre opened a private bank, which he operated several years under the name of the Ann Arbor Savings bank, number one; and the firm of Miller and Davis conducted one which they called the Ann Arbor Savings bank, number two.

"As the years wore along these banks found it increasingly difficult to keep above water, both finally being forced out of business some time before the opening of the Civil war. In those days banking laws had been but poorly worked out, specie was scarce and the country was flooded with all sorts of worthless paper. Moreover the nation-wide panic of 1857, made people reluctant to place their funds in banks, and in Ann Arbor the establishment of a bank for a while was not even attempted.

 
Financial Disturbances

"In the nation as a whole financial matters had gone fairly well up to the year 1853, but at that time a speculative mania took possession of the people. Financial leaders in Ann Arbor, reading the accounts of these disturbances, could not be expected recklessly to pool their resources and establish a bank. Then there was no such thing as a safety deposit vault, people often going about with bills and government bonds sewed up in their clothing. The demands for farm produce which came with the Civil war brought much of this worth from its hiding places and it was employed to advantage in prosperous times. Money became easier in Ann Arbor, it changed hands more often and loaning became common.

"The financial outlook was so good before the war was a year old that establishing a bank was no longer looked upon as a gamble. By the early spring of 1863 preliminary arrangements were made in accordance with the national banking law and the solicitation of subscriptions for stock begun. The authorized capital was $200,000, of which $75,000 was subscribed and paid in by March 20.

"Issues of the bank were to be secured by a deposit of government bonds at Washington and the government was to be responsible for their redemption. The new institution was the twenty-second chartered under the National Bank Act and it was to be known as the Ann Arbor city bank.

 
Chapin President

"The officers of the bank were Volney Chapin, president, Ebenezer Wells, vice president, and besides these the directors were to be C. H. Millen, Phillip Bach, James Clemants, R. S. Smith, David Henning, William McCreery and Hiram Arnold. These officers elected Charles H. Richmond cashier and J. W. Knight assistant cashier.

"The original location of the bank was in the store occupied up to that time by Dean & Co. in the Hangsterfer block. The confectionery shop was moved upstairs and Dean & Co. went in where the confectionery shop had been. The bank opened for business July 1, 1863, many depositors visiting the office before the day was out. This institution has been in operation ever since that time and now is not only the oldest bank in Washtenaw county but it is the oldest national bank in Michigan.

"After four years in the Hangsterfer block the bank (now known as the First National bank) moved into the store front block on Main St. where on the morning of Feb 28, 1867, the doors were again opened for business.

"Ten years after the bank was organized its resources were in the neighborhood of $450,000; thirty years after that (April, 1902) they had reached $513,197.96, and in 1925 they had climbed to approximately $2,700,000. In the spring of 1882, a new charter was obtained, the old officers keeping their positions. On the last Friday in May, the bank building was sold to Edward Treadwell for the sum of $13,950, the bank opening its doors under the new owners, June 1.

"In 1906, the erection of the present First National Bank building was begun, and it was completed in December, 1908, at a cost of $175,000.

 
Five Presidents

Five presidents have served the First National bank during its existence, these being Volney Chapin, Ebenezer Wells, Philip Back [Phillip Bach], Edward D. Kinne, and George W. Patterson, the present officer, who has held the position since 1921. Daniel B. Sutton is the present vice president, Robert F. Gauss, cashier, succeeding S. W. Clarkson who was cashier from 1883 to 1919, when he resigned; and Charles F. Gruner, Harry M. Hawley and Irwin E. Stoll, assistant cashiers. Directors follow: Waldo M. Abbot, S. W. Clarkson, M. J. Fritz, Robert F. Gauss, Harry M. Hawley, Walter C. Mack, George W. Patterson, Daniel B. Sutton, Frank A. Stivers, Erwin E. Schmid and Roy B. Hiscock.

The next bank, the Ann Arbor Savings bank was organized in the spring of 1869 in the office of Judge Thomas M. Cooley, in the old Law building on the campus. There were present at this mee
[t]ing Judge Cooley, Dr. R. S. Smith, Harvey Cornwall, Christian Overbach, William Dougal, E. W. Morgan, Daniel Hiscock, W. Wines, Christian Mack and W. D. Harriman. Sixty-nine stockholders were [continues on page 20...] listed on the original list, and Dr. Ransome S. Smith served a[s] the first president of this bank, and Schuyler Grant as cashier.

During the first 10 years the bank occupied a frame building where the Farmers & Mechanics bank now is located. It was opened for business May 11, 1869, with a capital stock of $50,000, the financial statement in December of that year showing resources of $163,469.02. In 1889, the stockholders filed articles of association, reorganizing for a period of 30 years and in 1919, another reorganization took place, the capital stock growing during these years from $50,000 to $400,000.

 
Dr. Smith President

Dr. Smith served as president until his death in 1876, with the exception of about a year and a half when Judge Cooley acted in this capacity. Christian Mack became the president following Dr. Smith, and in 1874, Mr. Grant resigned as cashier and was succeeded by Charles E. Hiscock. In 1879, the bank moved to its present quarters on the northwest corner of Main and Huron streets. Mr. Hiscock served as cashier of the Ann Arbor savings bank from 1876 to 1904, when he succeeded Mr. Mack as president. Michael J. Fritz took Mr. Hiscock's place as cashier and succeeded him as president in 1920. William L. Walz, present cashier, has held that position since 1906, and has been with the bank since 1891.

John C. Fritz, Alfred F. Staeb, Roy B. Hiscock, and Norman A. Ottmar, all assistant cashiers, complete the officers of the bank, which has at present no vice president, due to the death this spring of Carl F. Braun. The directors include M. J. Fritz, William L. Walz, Walter C. Mack, John C. Fritz, John E. Swisher, and Roy B. Hiscock. The branch bank on North University Ave. was opened in Sept. 1915, with Carl F. Braun in charge. Norman A. Ottmar is temporarily assuming his duties until the appointment of a new officer at the annual meeting in January.

The Farmers & Mechanics bank was organized in 1883, with Reuben Kemp
[f] as president, and W. A. Tolchard as cashier. Mr. Tolchard served as cashier of the bank until 1888, when he was succeeded by Fred H. Belser. Mr. Belser remained for 20 years and was succeeded in 1908 by Herbert A. Williams, who became president in 1912, following the death of Mr. Kempf. F. T. Stowe became cashier at the same time.
 
State Savings Bank

The State Savings bank was incorporated in November, 1892, with A. L. Noble as its first president, William Arnold, vice president, and Robert Phillips, cashier. Mr. Noble was succeeded in 1897, by W. J. Booth and C. John Walz became the cashier, succeeded by Mr. Phillips in 1903. The bank was opened for business April 1, 1893, on the site it now occupies.

William Arnold followed Mr. Booth as president in 1918, Mr. Walz succeeding him in 1925, and Rudolph E. Reichert, being named cashier at the same time. H. F. Gross is the present cashier, the other officers including George J. Mann, D. F. Zimmerman and R. A. Beal vice presidents, and D. P. McAuliffe, assistant cashier.

The German-American Savings bank, which was consolidated Jan. 1, 1916, with the State Savings bank, opened for business March 26, 1906, in the Charles J. Hutzel building at Main and Liberty streets.

According to the first published statement of the State Savings bank May 4, 1893, this bank's capital stock was $50,000 with the total assets placed at $99,535.32. Continued growth, and the merger of the two banks has been responsible for the increasing prosperity as indicated in the financial statement June 30, 1928. This shows capital stock of $400,000 with assets of more than $5,000,000.

Members of the present board of directors are William Arnold, Arthur Brown, R. S. Canfield, M. J. Cavanaugh, John M. Feiner, Clement W. Gill, John Koch, Charles F. Kyer, John Lindenschmitt, Christian Martin, Eugene F. Mills, George J. Mann, Andrew R. Peterson, E. W. Staebler, Charles W. Wagner, C. J. Walz and D. F. Zimmerman.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1929/08/05
Monday

Ann Arbor News
[article]
Pg.1

ENOCH DIETERLE TAKEN BY DEATH
Lifelong Resident, Former Undertaker, Dies at Summer Home

Enoch Dieterle, 64, of 300 South Revena Blvd., retired funeral director and a lifelong resident of this city, died Sunday morning at his summer cottage at Whitmore Lake, after a lingering illness.

He was born March 30, 1865, in Ann Arbor, where he later established a funeral home, remaining in this business until 10 years ago. He was a member of Zion Lutheran church, and the church brotherhood. Mr. Dieterle was a charter member and director of Schwaben Verein, and also was affiliated with B. P. O. Elks, No. 325 of Ann Arbor, Arbeiter Verein, and Michigan Undertakers association.

He is survived by his wife, Lydia Fiegel Dieterle; four brothers, Godfrey of Manchester, William of Detroit, Henry of Dexter and August of Baltimore, Md.; a sister, Dr. Anna Dieterle of Ann Arbor, and several nephews and nieces. Funeral services will be held at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon at the residence and at 3 o'clock at Zion Lutheran church. Rev. E. C. Stellhorn will officiate. Interment will be in Bethlehem cemetery.

1929/10/14
Tuesday

Ann Arbor News
[article]
Pg.6

Has Birthday Party [picture]

Mrs. Dora Gates of 1007 Myron place, widow of the late John A. Gates, was surprised Friday evening by her children and grandchildren at the home of the daughter, Mrs. J. D. [sic] Boylan of West Madison St. The occasion was Mrs. Gates' eighty-fourth birthday anniversary.

Mrs. Gates was the recipient of many gifts, cards and telegrams of congratulation. Four generations were present, including her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Music and games were enjoyed and refreshments served.

Mrs. Gates was born in Ann Arbor and has made her home here for practically her entire life. She is the mother of seven children, Mrs. J. B.
[sic] Boylan, Miss Bessie, Moore G., Dr. John L. and Dr. Neal A., all of Ann Arbor and William S. of Jackson. All except William were present at the party.

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This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.