1880-1889 Newspaper Notices

  Obituaries, Deaths, Marriages, Birthdays, and Notices
from Washtenaw County Newspapers
1880-1889


Compiled by Bobbie Snow and Contributors
 
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This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.

Date/Day
YYYY/MM/DD

Newspaper/
Source Type

Text

1882/11/??

Ann Arbor
Courier

[death column]
Pg.?

DIED GRANGER, Bradley F. Granger of the second ward, Ann Arbor, died Nov. 4, 1882 at the age of 56 years 7 months and 22 days. Disease, blood poisoning. Funeral Tuesday.

The Hon. Bradley F. Granger of this city, after a sickness of several weeks, died Saturday evening of senile gangrene. He was born in Lowville, N.Y. in March, 1826, but the greater part of his life had been passed in this county. He has held several offices, and at one time was a man of considerable influence in this part of the State. In 1856 he was judge of probate, from 1861-1865 a member of Congress from the first district, then composed of Wayne, Lenawee, Washtenaw and Monroe counties; and last July his term as justice of the peace expired. He had also been a deputy collector of internal revenue and in other offices. The bar association of the city met Tuesay afternoon and attended the funeral at two o'clock in body. It meets to-morrow at 9 a.m. to pass resolutions on the deceased. Judge Harriman, E.D. Kinne and A.W. Hamilton are the committee on resolution.

[Contributed by Andrea Cockrell, e-mail address removed by request 2-8-16]

1882/11/10
Friday

Ann Arbor
Democrat

[death column]
Pg.?

The Hon. Bradley F. Granger for many years a resident of this county, died Saturday night of blood poisoning, aged 56 years 6 months and 22 days. In 1856 he was elected judge of probate of this county, which office he filled for four years. In 1860 he was the republican nominee for congress and was elected by a good majority serving one term. In 1879 he was elected on the democratic ticket for justice of the peace, which office he held until the 4th day of last July when he was succeeded by M.H. Brennan. Judge Granger was a prominent member of the Washtenaw county bar. He was born in Lowville, Lewis county, N.Y. He leaves a wife and three sons and a large circle of acquaintences to mourn his loss.
[Contributed by Andrea Cockrell, email address removed by request 2-8-16]

1883/05/02
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

THE COUNTY
Mrs. Morgan Carpenter, of Manchester, died on Satruday the 21st, of old age. The funeral occurred on Tuesday of last week, and was conducted by Rev. Mr. Rice of Toledo. Mrs. Carpenter was the mother of Mrs. Frank Spaffard and Mrs. A. Conklin.

1883/05/02
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

THE COUNTY
South Lyon Picket: Mrs. Packard, wife of Orson Packard, one of the early settlers of the town of Salem, coming there in 1826, died last week. Deceased was sevetny-seven years of age and leaves a large number of friends to mourn her loss.

1883/05/02
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

THE COUNTY
Mr. Horace Richmond, a former resident of Dexter, died at Pontiac on Sunday, the 22dn
[sic]. The funeral exercises took place at Dexter last Wednesday.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

Tommy, the little son of E. T. Aldrich, of Saline, had the end of one of his fingers cut off in a feed cutting machine on Tuesday of last week.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

Mr. Seeley E. Davis, of Augusta, was married to Miss Linnie A. Freeman, at the residence of the bride's father in Ypsilanti, last week Tuesday.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

Tommy, the little son of E. T. Aldrich, of Saline, had the end of one of his fingers cut off in a feed cutting machine on Tuesday of last week.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

THE COUNTY
Lorenzo Greenman, a former resident of Manchester, died in prison at Dannemora, New York, the other day. He was a mason by trade, and a good workman, but addicted to the use of liquor. When the red-ribbon movement was started, he reformed and became a prominent temperance worker. A few years ago, however, he fell into his old habit, and, when intoxicated, attempted to kill his wife, for which he was sentenced to the imprisonment.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

THE COUNTY
The little son of George Hertler, who lives near Urania
[in York Twp.], fell from a rack in his father's barn, a week ago Sunday, and broke his right arm.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

THE COUNTY
Mr. George Ruthruff, a carpenter of Superior, fell from a scaffold, on Saturday, April 28, striking on his shoulders and sustaining painful injuries.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

Mr. L.D. Showerman has been brought to his home in Ypsilanti. His condition is very poor and physicians have given up hope of his recovery.

1883/05/09
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Register

[column]
Pg.1

THE COUNTY
Arthur B. Webb, a former Manchester boy, has secured a position in an Indianapolis bank.

1883/12/21
Friday

Ann Arbor Argus
[death column]
Pg.?

LAWTON- In Northfield, Dec. 14, Eliza, wife of John Lawton, aged 37 years.
[Contributed by Ann Wright,  Comment: Eliza is my great-grandmother. [wrights@ atl.mediaone.net, broken 3-8-15]

1885/10/30
Friday

Ann Arbor Argus
[death column]
Pg.?

Edmund Lawton of Green Oak, whose death resulted from hemmorrage of the bowels, was buried from the Northfield Catholic Church on Monday.
[Contributed by Ann Wright,  [wrights@ atl.mediaone.net, broken 3-8-15], Comment: He lived in Green Oak, Livingston County, but was buried in Washtenaw County. Several of his children lived in Northfield, Washtenaw County.]

1885/11/12
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Register

[article]
Pg.5

Death of Capt. Connett.

Captain John W. Connett died yesterday morning of liver troubles at the residence of his mother, Mrs. Caroline Loomis, on Ann-st., aged 73 years and 5 months. He had been ill for some time but it had not been supposed that dissolution was so imminent. The funeral will be held tomorrow.

Capt. Connett was born in western New York and in early manhood became captain of a canal boat on the Erie canal, hence his title. He came to Chicago in 1848 and resided there 36 years, during which time he held many positions of trust and was a well known democrat. He was sergeant at-arms of the house of representatives just before the war, and the chief marshal of the democratic convention in Chicago which nominated McClellan. He has also been connected with the police commission in Chicago. A year ago on account of failing health he moved to this city.

Capt. Connett was one of the old-style democrats and was very popular in the party here. He leaves his wife and his sister in this city and other relatives in Manchester and Tecumseh.

1885/11/12
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Register

[article]
Pg.5

Death of Dr. W. G. Terry.

It will be a satisfaction to the many friends of Dr. W. G. Terry whose death occurred in this city on the 8th, to know that though he was unable to see them in his long illness, they were often spoken of and remembered with kindness. Almost to the last he had strong hopes of soon being out again, and took a lively interest in the daily events of the town. His severe sufferings for over four months, often most agonizing in form, were borne with great patience, and a cheerful courage, that was beautiful to see. His knowledge of disease enabled him to detect the various changes, and complicated phases in his own case, which he calmly explained, even to the premonitions of insanity, which her feared and truly feared, must be the final result. His parents so long known in this city, have the fullest sympathy of the community and a large circle of personal friends.

1885/11/12
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Register

[article]
Pg.8

Dr. Will G. Terry, son of A. A. Terry, of this city, died Sunday morning of inflammatory rheumatism after a long illness, aged 32 years and 8 months. Dr. Terry graduated from the medical department in 1876, but practiced only four years. He was for a time a pension clerk in Washington, but most of his life has been spent in this city, where he leaves a wide circle of sorrowing friends.
[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1885/11/13
Friday

Ann Arbor
Democrat

[column]
Pg.3

We regret to chronicle the death of Dr. Will G. Terry, which occurred Sunday at 1:30 a.m. at the home of his parents in this city, after an illness of four months, of inflammatory rheumatism. Dr. Terry was born in this city March 4, 1853, where he spent his boyhood days and graduated in the medical department of the university, with the class of '76. He then practiced medicine at Otter Lake for one year, after which he removed to Warren, M[a]comb county, where he spent three years at his profession and was one of the leading local politicians, and returned to this city in 1880. The Doctor also spent some time as a clerk in the pension department at Washington. He was well known to the citizens of Ann Arbor, and all unite in sympathizing with his parents in their bereavement.

1885/11/13
Friday

Ann Arbor
Democrat

[column]
Pg.3

Wm. H. Lewis has rented the Follett House of Geo. Moorman for three and a half years. he house is fitted up in superb style. Not many hotels excel its complete furnishings. Mr. And Mrs. Lewis are born managers of a popular hotel. While having charge of the Lewis house they had the reputation of setting one of the best tables of any hotel in the state. Commercial travelers took pains to stop at Ypsilanti on account of the superior attractions of the hotel. It will be doubly so now. –Ypsilanti Commercial. For years Mr. Lewis was engaged in the hotel business in Ann Arbor, first as proprietor of the Leonard house, and still later of the St. James. He enjoyed the same reputation here that he did when running the Lewis house – of setting a No. 1 table. Mr. L. is an obliging and popular landlord, and always makes it pleasant for his guests. Success again, William.

1885/11/18
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier

[marriage column]
Pg.2

POSTLE-GLENN —-At the residence of the bride's parents, Urbana, Ohio, on Thursday evening, October 29th, 1885, by the Rev. Edward McGuffey, Mr. J. M. Postle and Miss Belle C. Glenn.

Miss Glenn is a daughter of Isaac D. Glenn, and grand-daughter of the late Edmund Glenn, who in 1852 laid out and founded Glendale, a suburb of Cincinnati. Her education was completed at Ann Arbor, Michigan, where she met the groom. Dr. Postle is a graduate of the medical class of '85, of Michigan University. He is now a practicing physician of Hinckley, Ill. May success and happiness attend the couple through life.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1885/11/18
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier

[column]
Pg.3

Adam Goetz, a brother of John Goetz, and a resident of Brown street, 1st ward, died Friday last aged 65 years. He was a native of Wurtemburg, Germany.

1885/11/20
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus

[column]
Pg.3

The Ypsilantian and Dexter Leader kick against the pardon of John J. Raser, convicted in our circuit court for bigamy a couple of years ago. Raser married Miss Alice Rosier of Dexter township, a girl without the cunning to resists [sic] the sinister designs of a villainous shyster lawyer from Chicago, whose wife appeared in court and as witness convicted her husband. Raser was after Miss Rosier's money, and got instead five years at Jackson. Everybody ought to kick against a pardon of the scoundrel.

1885/11/20
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus

[column]
Pg.3

Mr. Wm. Sweeney, a resident of this city for the past six years, died Saturday evening, aged 51 years, of cancerous tumor of the stomach. He was born in County Donegal, Ireland. He leaves a widow and six children to mourn his loss.

1885/11/20
Friday

Ann Arbor
Argus

[column]
Pg.3

Keeper of the county house McDowell escorted two colored girls Alice aged 6, and Ida Thornton aged 5 years, sisters, to the Coldwater reform school yesterday. They are bright children and hail from Saline. Their mother is dead and their father refuses to support them. They were committed by the superintendents of the poor.

1885/11/25
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Courier

[column]
Pg.?

Through some error, the mystery of which we have not as yet been able to solve, a notice of the death of Mr. Wm. Sweeney of the 4th ward, was left out of our columns last week. Mr. Sweeney died on Saturday evening, Nov. 14th , aged 51 years. He had been ill for about one year, with cancerous tumor of the stomach, and had been a great sufferer. The deceased was born in County Donnegal, Ireland, in 1834 and came to the United States when a young man, settling in Marshall. Here he remained for a number of years, engaged in business, running a grocery, bakery, etc., and was generally esteemed by his fellow citizens. Some six years since he removed to this county where he resided until his death. He leaves a wife and six children, four daughters and two sons, to mourn the loss of a kind and indulgent father. His remains were taken to Marshall, and there interred in Oak Ridge Cemtery.

1889/04/18
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Register

[death column]
Pg.?

Webster - John Boyle has been lying at the point of death, for some days, with pneumonia caused by a severe cold being contracted while riding in a storm. Dr. Smith, of the Lake is attending. A consultation was held Saturday, the other physician being Dr. Breakey. They found no hopes of recovery.
[Contributed by Mary Ferguson, mfergus (at) tir.com]

1889/04/25
Thursday

Ann Arbor
Register

[death column]
Pg.?

Webster - For two weeks John Boyle lingered with pneumonia until Friday, April 19, when death came to his relief. The funeral was held Monday at the Catholic church of Northfield, of which he was a devoted member. His death was much grived by all who knew him. He leaves no family, but only two maiden sisters and a brother, J. H. Boyle, of Emery.
[Contributed by Mary Ferguson, mfergus (at) tir.com]

 
This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.