1930-2000 Newspaper Notices

Obituaries, Deaths, Marriages, Birthdays, and Notices
from Washtenaw County Newspapers
1930-2000


Compiled by Bobbie Snow and Contributors
 
1840s | 1850s | 1860s | 1870s | 1880s | 1890s | 1900s
1910s | 1920s | 1930+ | ???? | Index A-L | Index M-Z
Introduction | Terms, Titles, & Abbreviations | Submit News Item

 
This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.

Date/Day
YYYY/MM/DD

Newspaper/
Source Type

Text

1931/01/03
Saturday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.1

DEATH CLAIMS LOCAL WOMAN
Mrs. C. S. Millen Passes Away at Age of 84; Services Monday

Mrs. Charles S. Millen, 84, of 815 Lawrence St., prominent in club circles of the city, died at 3 o'clock this morning, after a long illness. She wast the widow of the late C. S. Millen, dry good merchant here many years.

Mrs. Millen was born July 13, 1846, in New York City and was educated in a private school in Elizabeth, N.J. Her maiden name was Eliza "Voy" Young. She came to Ann Arbor when about 20 years old and taught in the public schools here for two years and then went to Detroit, where she taught for a year in Prof. Sills private school.

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Millen was the first wedding to be solemnized in St. Andrew's Episcopal church of this city and the wedding reception for them was the first reception to be attended by the late Dr. James B. Angell, president of the University, and Mrs. Angell, in Ann Arbor.

As a young girl, Mrs. Millen, accompanied by her aunts, journeyed to New York City to see the furneral for Abraham Lincoln. Mrs. Millen was fond of the out of doors and for the past 30 years had gone every summer to Coryell island, Les Cheneaux islands, where she built a cottage in 1900.

She was a member of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the Colonial Dames of America, and Goodwill circle of King's Daughters, the Ann Arbor Women's club, Ladies' Aid society and Delta Delta Delta sorority. She was one of the first to aid in the building of the Michigan League and was one of the first women to serve on the board of the Old Ladies' Home.

Mrs. Millen had three sons, Dr. Stewart Millen, who died a number of years ago in New Orleans, another who died at birth, and a third, DeWitt C. Millen, who resides in Ann Arbor. Her husband died four years ago on Oct. 5.

Funeral services will be held at 3 o'clock Monday afternoon at the residence, with Rev. Henry Lewis of St. Andrews' Episcopal church officiating. Interment will be in Forest Hill cemetery.

Active pallbeareres will be Rice Beal, Harry Nichols, James Murnan, jr.,, and John Coryell, all of Ann Arbor, Roy Lindsay of Ypsilanti and Harold Wines of Jackson. The honorary bearers include Regent Junius E. Beal, Dr. Frederick Novy, sr., Charles B. Coe, Dr. Dean W. Myers, Frank B. DeVine, Levi D. Wines, Andrew Tanner, Adolph Diehl, Fred P. Stowe, Ralph Lutz, Lewis Richards and George W. Millen.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

1931/01/06
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.6

Good Will the Watchword of "Mother Millen's" Life

One son survives Mrs. Eliza Millen, who, at the age of 84, laid down life's burdens last week. But many adopted "children" likewise are left to mourn her passing. For Mrs. Millen might be regarded, in a humanitarian sense, as a community mother.

She was a member of many organizations, charitable and otherwise, and among them was the Good Will circle of King's Daughters. There is, perhaps, more significance to her membership in that society than in the others, by reason of its title. For the words, Good Will, are symbolical of Mrs. Millen's life.

As observed above, she laid down "life's burdens." But they were not burdens of personal affliction. Rather, they were the woes of the world. For she was supremely unselfish.

There are many little stories to demonstrate her concern for the welfare of others. In northern Michigan, where whe spent her summers, was a family living on an island, far from the schools. It appeared that the children would not find an education available, but Mrs. Millen worked out a plan somewhat novel thought simple in its feasibility. She arranged for the house to be moved across the ice, during the winter, to an island that boasted schools. And she defrayed the cost.

A maid in her employ contracted pneumonia, and was ill for weeks. Instead of having the girl removed to a hospital, Mrs. Millen kept her at home and nursed her successfully through the attack.

She was not a woman to accept opportunities for benevolent deeds merely when they happened along. She went out in the world and created such opportunities.

Hers was a well-rounded life, and a long one. It may have been largely because she lived for others. The nourishment that sustained her was the joy produced when through her instrumentalities misery was set aside.

The surviving son cannot feel, then, that he is even comparatively alone in his bereavement. There were too many persons who took the liberty, in a spirit of endearment and reverence, to call this woman "mother."

Yes, she belonged to the Good Will circle. But with due respect for the noble purposes of the organization so named, we make bold here to appropriate the title for application to the broad general field of Mrs. Millen's personal activities, from day to day. The Good Will circle of this Grand Old Lady was ever expanding, even during the twilight of her life, to circumvent the difficulties, great and small, that strew those vast plains where human beings toil in quest of happiness.

The spirit of Christmas was alive in her soul, through all the months of the calendar. Good Will, expressed not in philosophical words but in kindly Christian deeds, was the motive power of Mother Millen's existence.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

ca 1932/01/08
Friday

unidentified
clipping

Mrs. George C. Gale

Mary E. Packard was born January 19th, 1863 in Superior township, Washtenaw County, Michigan. On December 13th, 1883 she married George C. Gale and the young couple went to fa
[r]ming in Superior township. Four children were born to this union two of whom died in early life.

Twenty-eight years ago the family moved to Plymouth where they have lived since that time. For some time, Mrs. Gale has been in failing heath and for the past twenty months has been confined to her home. She suffered much, but with a marked degree of patience and fortitude. The end came quietly just after midnight, January 8th, 1932.

There are left to mourn her death, her husband George C. Gale, two daughters, Mrs. Edith Elkington, Northville, and Mrs. Gladys Shrader, Plymouth; four grandchildren and many friends.

The funeral, largely attended took place from Schrader Bros. Funeral Home to Riverside cemetery on Sunday, January 10th at 2:30 p.m. Rev. Walter Nichol of First Presbyterian church, Plymouth, officiated.

[Contributed by Charla Kurtz, charlakurtz (at) yahoo.comThe Lyke and Livingston Families]

1932/01/11
Monday

Ann Arbor Daily News
[article]
Pg.?

Ann Arbor Literary Folk
Lose Favorite Haunt

[Photograph of "The Barn"]

Unpretentious it was, this hybrid structure, half-house, half-barn. There was no plate glass in its wide front door. There was no rich luster to its hardware. No famous products of the brush and palette graced its rough board walls. Yet, until fire consumed it out there at the head of Spring St., where it overlooked the town and river it represented something as dear to many as if it had been composed of rich, weight-sagged tapestries and marbled halls.

The structure was the "Barn." That was all. But its darkly raftered roof has looked down on many a merry party of literary folk, some of whom since have achieved envious places in the world of letters. Its little stove has radiated comfort to delightfully informal groups of men and women who brought with them their recorded brain children and who, in succession, half hopefully, half defiantly, paraded these created offspring for approbation or submergence. The reading of manuscripts was both a pleasant and disappointing event, but always a serious one.

 
Just a Barn in 1924

The windows of the remodeled barn have looked out on night scenes that might have had their setting on the banks of Mother Volga. Indeed, to the leaping light of an enormous bonfire crackling on the hillside not far away, the infinitely sad syllables of the Burlaki song and other compositions ascended melodiously into the blackness with the streaming sparks of the fire, for many sons and daughters of Russia came out from Detroit to spend a night at "The Barn."

That was in 1924. The structure had come into the possession of Agnes Inglis. The building truly was a barn in 1924. Festooned with cobwebs and the accumulation of many years of habitation by creatures of the field and beasts of burden, the barn also was equipped with a workroom and other spaces. The owner set about to make it semi-habitable and in so doing, had partitions removed. A stove was installed.

The first gathering was held, and the rustic surroundings appealed mightily to Russian men and women who came out from Detroit for an evening of singing and outdoor dancing. Other groups were invited for an informal occasion. They came. The fascination of the old barn held them and they came again. The fame of the structure spread.

In this first group of Russians was Steve and Anna Kozakevich. They sang well. Now they form part of a New York City group who entertain frequently on radio programs.

Among those who gathered to listen to the melodious Russian voices out on the hillside where the bonfire sparks rushed up to meet the stars, or under the dimly candle-lighted rafters of the Barn, were literary folk of Ann Arbor. Yes, and of other places in the world, too.

 
Many Gain Fame

Many of them have made names for themselves. There is Stirling Bowen, for example, whose volume "Wishbone" is well known to patrons of the library, and whose poems are known over the English-speaking world by poetry lovers. Then there was Florence McClinchy, whose "Jo Pete" has taken its place as one of the decade's best read books. Jo Pete belongs to the Barn. Hallie Flanagan, too, director of the Experimental theater of Vassar college and author of "Shifting Scenes" and writer for Theater Arts Monthly, knows and loves the Barn. The Russian singers became a memory but those who had gathered at the Barn to hear them kept coming of their own accord.

Many of those who came belonged to the old time "Do-Dos" group. They brought with them much of the same spirit which had animated the Do-Dos in the old days when they flourished.

The Do-Dos is another story, to be written for itself. Some will say that this was the most outstanding creative group that ever struggled for expression in Ann Arbor. They, too, met in a barn on Spring St. The structure long since has disappeard.

There was Margaret Grenell, the originator and spirit of the Do-Dos and her husband, the late Judson Grenell. Then there was Lawrence H. Conrad, who since has served as president of the Michigan Authors' association. He's in New Jersey now. And Mrs. Conrad read her delightful little bits. Little Larry was the mascot poet.

 
Literary Seances

There were others, many others, who gathered around to participate in those "literary seances" so dear to the heart of the writer.

And then came "The Barnstormers." This was a group of younger men and women, most of them University students, who found existing campus publications of the times poor media for their expressions. This group was led by Prof. Peter Monro Jack, former head fo the rhetoric department of the University. Included in this group were at least two who since have earned recognition in the form of major cash awards in the University's Hopwood contests. They are Miss Frances Jennings and Miss Jean Gilman, both proteges, more or less, of Lawrence Conrad.

The Barnstormers met for frequent readings and had planned to continue the events this year, had not the fire of Nov. 14 destroyed the structure.

Last winter, the last of the Barn's existence, the little stove was kept going full time. For the first and last time the structure was occupied full time, as it were. The "hermit" was Rex Grahm, itinerant newspaper correspondent, whose assignments had carried him to the world's most interesting capitals. Rex's restless spirit asserted itself with the coming of warm weather, however, and the last heard of him told of how, in the companionship of another, he was "starving" his way down the Mississippi on a houseboat.

It was a dark, heavy grey morning in November when the fire department answered a call to the Sunset road section of the city. The word came back through the mist.

"The Barn" was no more.

[Contributed by S. Brevoort]

1933/016?/10
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.10

BODY IS RECOVERED FROM HURON RIVER
Post Mortem Examination is Ordered in Death of Frank Gaines

The body of Frank Gaines, 46 years old, Negro, 1066 Wall St., who had been missing from his home since early Saturday evening, was found today in the Huron river at the power plant of the Detroit Edison Co. on Broadway. An Edison employee saw the body and notified police. Dr. Edwin C. Ganzhorn, coroner, was notified and when a cursory examination showed a wound on top of the head of the body, ordered a post-mortem to determine if the wound had been caused by a blow from some instrument. Dr. Ganzhorn said that the wound may have been caused by the body striking the iron grates of the power plant. If the post mortem indicates foul play, an inquest will be ordered, the coroner said. The examination was being made at University hospital. Gaines left his home at 5 o'clock on Saturday afternoon and last was seen on the Broadway bridge, police said. The deceased was born March 18, 1887. He is survived by two sons Freeman and Sylvester of Ann Arbor; his father, Frank Gaines of this City; two brothers William H. of Detroit and Maurice of Ann Arbor, three sisters, Mrs. Ella Wilson, Mrs. Henry Jackson, and Mrs. Don Grayer, all of Ann Arbor and several nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be held at 4 o'clock Wednesday afteroon at Forest Hill cemetery. Rev. C. W. Carpenter will officiate.

1933/016?/11
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.10

NO EVIDENCE OF FOUL PLAY FOUND.

No evidence to show that foul play was connected with the death of Frank Gaines, 46, Negro, whose body was found Monday in the Huron river, was shown by an autopsy at University Hospital, Dr. Edwin C. Ganzhorn, coroner, announced today. Dr. Ganzhorn also said that the autopsy showed no evidence of alcohol in the stomach of the man who had been missing since Saturday evening. Dr. Ganzhorn has turned the investigation over to police. A wound on the head of the body was not of such severity to cause death, the examination showed. Funeral services for Mr. Gaines will be held Wednesday afternoon at the Muehlig chapel. Rev. C. W. Carpenter will officiate. Burial will be in Forest Hill Cemetery.

1933/06/12
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.11

WOMEN DIE AFTER BRIEF ILLNESSES OF SCARLET FEVER
Special to the Daily News

Ypsilanti, June 12. Two Ypsilanti women died during the weekend, following brief illnesses with scarlet fever and private funeral services will be held out of doors for each of them. Mrs. Nellie Webster, 39, resident of Oaklawn Blvd., this city, died Saturday evening. Funeral services were held this afternoon in Highland cemetery. Mrs. Ethel E. Drake, 40, 610 East Cross St., widow of the late LaVerne Drake, died today and funeral services will be held Tuesday afternoon in the Dixboro cemetery. Mrs. Drake is survived by four children, her father, William Mulholland, Superior township, one sister, Verdie Mulholland; and three brothers, Frank and Walter Mulholland, both of Ann Arbor, and Emory Mulholland, Superior township.

1933/06/12
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.11

FRED. KENNY PASSES AWAY SUDDENLY AT HOME IN DETROIT
(Special to the Daily News).

Ypsilanti, June 12 (AP)-Word was received here today of the sudden death this morning of Fred Kenny, 65, of Detroit, brother of George Kenny, 417 Emmet St., this city. Mr. Kenny, who was well known in Ypsilanti, died from an attack of heart disease said to have been brought on by aiding in lifting a heavy stove some days ago. He has been ill since that time. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. Besides the brother in Ypsilanti, Mr. Kenny is survived by his widow, Mrs. Hettie Kenny.

1933/06/13
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.14

FRED KENNY TO BE BURIED WEDNESDAY.
(Special to the Daily News)

Ypsilanti, June 13-AP-Funeral services for Fred. P. Kenny, 65, native of Ypsilanti and resident of this city for 37 years, will be held at 1:30 Wednesday afternoon in the United Presbyterian Church, Grand River Ave. Detroit. Services will be in charge of Rev. Ralph W. Mansfield, pastor of the church, and burial will be in Udell Cemetery, southeast of Ypsilanti. Mr. Kenny, who had been in poor health for the past few weeks, died suddenly Monday morning at his home in Detroit, and was found dead in his bed by his wife, who went into the room to call him. An attack of heart disease is believed to have been the cause of death. Mr. Kenny was born in Ypsilanti Aug. 25, 1867 and was educated in the schools of this city. He was a son of Mr. And Mrs. Anthony Kenny. On Dec. 8, 1904 he married Miss Henrietta Tuttle of this city, who survives him. He also is survived by a brother, George Kenny, 417 Emmet St., Ypsilanti.

1934/02/12
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.3

MRS. MAUDE THAYER DIES IN JACKSON;
TO BE BURIED WEDNESDAY.
(Special to the Daily News)

Ypsilanti., Feb. 12 - Funeral services will be held s 10:30 Wednesday morning at the J.E. Moore funeral home here for Mrs. Maude Thayer, widow of the late William Thayer, former resident of this city. Mrs. Thayer died Sunday at her home in Jackson and the body is being brought here for burial in Highland Cemetery. Services will be in charge of Rev. Marshall R. Reed, pastor of First Methodist Church here. For many years Mr. And Mrs. Thayer resided in Ypsilanti, their home being at the corner or Lowell and Ann streets.

1934/02/12
Monday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.1

DAUGHTER OF CHELSEA FOUNDER PASSES AWAY
(Special to the Daily News)

Chelsea, Feb. 12-Mrs. Betsey Congdon Morton, widow of Andrew Morton, formerly of Chelsea and a daughter of Elisha Congdon, one of the founders of this village, died Feb. 7 in Torrington, Conn., according to word received here today. She was born in Chelsea, the daughter of Elisha and Elouisa Standish Congdon, both pioneer settlers here. She is survived by two sons, Fred J. of Weekawken N.J. and Harry D. of New York City; a daughter Mrs. Thomas Thompson of Torrington; two grandsons, two granddaughters and a great-grandson. Funeral services are taking place in Torrington, and the body will be brought to Chelsea in the spring for burial in Oak Grove cemetery here.

1934/02/14
Wednesday

Ann Arbor
Daily News

[article]
Pg.6

Celebrate Golden Wedding Anniversary

The golden rule of doing unto others as you would have them do unto you is a sure recipe for staying happily married for 50 years, says Mrs. Henry Burt Waters of Lodi township, and her husband agrees. Mr. and Mrs. Waters celebrated their golden wedding anniversary today -- Valentine's day -- with a family dinner at their farm home, eight miles southwest of Ann Arbor. Hearts in streamers decorated the dining room and a golden heart in the center was inscribed with the year of the marriage. Today was a gala day for the couple and neither was permitted to do any work on this anniversary. Mrs. Waters was allowed to spend this week cutting out the red hearts and sewing them into streamers and to participate in other preparations for the celebration, but today was a holiday and the sons and daughters and grandchildren insisted that the guests of honor make it just that.

Many Relatives
There is such a large relationship that the dinner today was limited practically to relatives and they filled the large house to bring their best wishes. The Waters also heard form friends and neighbors who sent their greetings. A turkey dinner was the event at noon and the remainder of the day was spent in visiting. The farm in Lodi where they make their home was settled by Mr. Waters grandfather, Jonathan Waters in 1831, and the present house was built about 68 years ago. Mr. Waters was born on this farm Jan. 16, 1860, while Mrs. Waters, who before her marriage was Addie Forshee, was born May 1, 1862 near Plymouth. They were married Feb. 14, 1884 at Plymouth by Rev. W. W. Wetmore. The twenty-fifth anniversary of their marriage was celebrated in St. paul, Minn., where they lived about 15 years. The remainder of their married life has been spent in Washtenaw County.

Born in New York Mr. Waters is the third generation of his family to operate the farm. His father was Giles S. Waters a native of New York, who came to this county with his parents. His wife was Mary Jane Davis Waters, who also was born in New York state. The amiability of the Waters family is demonstrated in several generations living together in the family home. Until Mr. Waters mother died about 10 years ago, there were four generations living in the home for about four years and now there are three. The three generations include 13 persons, which is almost enough in itself for a celebration. When the Waters family started to hold family reunions about severn years ago, it was found the family included more than 300 persons. Mr. and Mrs. Waters have four children living, Guy F. and Burt Jr., with whom they live on the farm, Mrs. C.E. Stewart of Green Bay, Wis, who came home for the celebrations and Mrs. J. F. Oliver of San Jose, Calif. They also have 12 grandchildren. A daughter, Leola, died in 1900.
[Photograph included with story.]

1934/08/30
Thursday

Chelsea
Standard

[article]

History of Rogers Corners School
Freedom Township, Washtenaw County
Rogers Corners
Chelsea, Michigan

The following history of Rogers Corners school the 100th anniversary of which was observed on Sunday, August 19, 1934 was prepared by Miss Irene Huehl, present teacher of the school.

The first settler in Freedom township, James W. Hill, came in the summer of 1831. In the spring and summer the following year many other immigrants came. Among those that settled in this district were Mr. Scott, who settled on what is now the Christian Haas farm, George Peckens of the George Loeffler farm, Prestons on the farms now owned by Mrs. Christian Grau and Clarence Buss, Juda McLean on the William Eiseman farm, Mr. Tucker on Jacob Schneider’s farm, Mr. Wellman on Mrs. Charles Buss farm, another Mr. Wellman on the John Grau farm, M.B. Wellman on the Schiller farm, and Ruben Wellman on Ezra Feldkamp’s farm. Edward Litchfield settled on the Herbert Schenk farm, Joseph Sternberg on the George Hinderer farm, David C. Raymond on the Edwin Kuhl farm, Mr. Rogers on John Wenk’s farm, another Mr. Rogers on the place now owned by William Beuerle, and Levi Rogers on the Jacob Koengeter farm. It was after the Roger families that the corner received the name Rogers Corners. As may be seen, the first settlers were in a majority Americans, whereas now the larger portion of the landholders are German.

The first task of these pioneers was that of building for themselves a home. This was made of logs. They then set about to clear and improve the land which was largely timber. The children of these first settlers grew up in the wilds where wolves were more plentiful than domestic animals.

Even though there was but a handful of people; and the wilderness a handicap, these pioneers did not forget about education. They were determined that their children should have a knowledge of the three R's - reading, 'riting and 'rithmetic.

During the years of 1834-5 school was held in the homes of the various members. One of these was the Sternberg home-now the Hinderer home.

Later the settlement was of sufficient numbers to insure the building of a schoolhouse. This was authorized at the first meeting recorded and dated November 18, 1836. At this time the taxable inhabitants of the district convened, agreeable to previous notice and proceeded to business by electing Lyman Williams, chairman, and Levi Rogers, clerk. It was voted to raise one hundred dollars or under as the case may be for the purpose of providing a convenient schoolhouse and stove for the use of the district. The school was to be built of logs. The meeting adjourned and was recorded in the district book by Daniel Rouse, director.

The second meeting recorded was held May 27, 1837. Thirty dollars was allowed for the use of the summer school which was to be continued five months. New officers elected were as follows; Moderator, Alexander Pecans; director, Daniel Rouse; and assessor Manassah Wellman. The officers received 75 cents per day for their services.

The same year in October, ninety dollars was voted for the use of the school the ensuing year. The school year was to consist of four months of winter school to begin about the first of November, and five months of summer school, if there was money enough. New officers were again elected, the election of which resulted as follows: David C. Raymond, moderator; S.S. Peckens, director, and Levi Rogers assessor.

In the year of 1838 the district voted to put a tax on each scholar. How much do you think that was? Well, here it is - sixty-four feet of wood two feet long to be furnished by the parent or guardian within ten days from the time that each scholar entered school. If the wood was not furnished, the deficiency was furnished by the director within ten days thereafter at the rate of three dollars per cord to be paid by the delinquent. Edward Litchfield was elected moderator, Richard Ayers, director, and Jacob Preston, assessor.

During the next four years, no special business was transacted. The by-laws of 1838, concerning the furnishing of fuel and having nine months of school, were continually adopted. The officers were changed each year; however, the only new names listed were Frederick Lee, moderator and S. Woods director in 1839, and William Preston assesor in 1840.

The officers elected in 1842 were Levi Rogers, moderator, Frederick Lee, assessor, and William Preston director. On June 5, 1842 were Levi Rogers, moderator, Frederick Lee, assessor, and William Preston director. On June 5, 1843 a petition was presented to the officers to call a special meeting June 17 of the district "for the purpose of raising such sum as the district shall think be, also to establish a site for the schoolhouse, and to choose a committee to draft a plan for the house." This petition was signed by Ruben Williams, S.S. Peckins, Nelson Wells, G. Raymond, G.H. McLean, Solomon McArthur, Robert Triggs, G.S. Peckens, Edward Moon, and Seth Chase.

At the special meeting it was voted to raise two hundred dollars for the purpose of building a schoolhouse to replace the log school. The committee appointed consisted of S.C. Barber, Seth Chase, and Levi Rogers.

At the regular meeting of the district of this year new officers elected were Seth Chase, moderator; Jeremiah Hover, assessor, and L.R. McLean, director.

A special meeting was held the eleventh day of December 1843 for the purpose of selling the log school and the stove to the highest bidder. The house was sold to Mr. Geralds for four dollars and fifty cents. The money thus received was paid toward the purchase of a new stove.

The names appearing in the list of officers from 1843 to 1875 are: James Raymond, Mathew Butler, Horace Rogers, Samuel Gressor, Alexander Peckens, Stephen Tucker, John Essig, H.J. Davidter, William Pfitzenmaier, John Huehl, Sr., Frederick Eiseman, John Schenk and John Messner. All officers were changed each year until 1860 when the present method was adopted.

In 1875 the district again decided that a new school building was needed. A building fund was started with two hundred fifty dollars raised by tax. It was also stated in the minutes of this meeting that the four months of winter school were to begin the first of October and the summer term after the closing of the German school.

At the regular meeting in 1876 the district voted to build a new school the coming year, 1877. Three hundred dollars was added to the building fund. Joseph Davidter was elected director. The other two office holders were moderator, John Messner, and assessor, Frederick Eiseman.

January 5, 1877 a special meeting was held. At this meeting it was resolved that the district build a brick schoolhouse 26x46x15 feet. This is the school in use at present.

The electing of officers, deciding the length of the school terms, and letting of contracts for furnishing and sawing wood were the important items of business transacted during the next few years. New names appearing in the list of officers from 1877 to 1900 are: Gotfried Grau, Henry Kuhl, Barney Bertke, Dan Strieter, Herman Niehaus, Christian Grau and Lewis Geyer.

In 1890 the plaster of the ceiling was removed and the ceiling sealed with lumber. The interior was then painted.
In 1891 the district voted to have the teacher board himself.
In 1904 the board fence was removed and replaced by a chain fence in front of the school.
In 1902 the building was painted both on the exterior and interior. The following year it was rodded.
In 1908 the school was equipped with a slate blackboard. It was also voted to keep the children in the school yard.

A platform was built on the steps, and a new floor put in during 1909. About 1911 the winter, spring and fall terms of school were dropped, and a continuous term of nine months was adopted. A cement porch with a roof was built in 1912.

October 13, 1913 a special meeting was held for the purpose of deciding about a new heating plant. A furnace was installed.

After 1913 there were no further changes until 1934 when the CWA made extensive alterations on the building, making it a nearly standard school.

The first teacher of which we have a record is D.F. Rockwell. He taught in 1838 during the winter term for fifty-six dollars and seventy seven cents. The summer term of that year was taught by C.C. Auger for $32. The winter term was usually taught by a man, and the summer term by a woman.

Following is a list of teachers:
1839-Isaac Magoon and Miss H.C. Chipman, Miss Antoniette Foster at one dollar and fifty cents a week.
1840-Miss Foster; Gilbert Hudson, Miss Hill.
1841-H. Becker, Miss Boye, at 25 Cents per day.
1842-L.R. McLean, Miss Underhill
1843-L.R. McLean, Miss Crane.
1844-A.H. Crane, Miss Foster
1845-J.B.Watson, Miss Foster
1846-Wm Magoon, A. Crane
1847-O.H. Easton, Helen Dond.
1848-A. King, Helen Dond.
1849-O. Easton, Susan A. Smith
1850-Lafayette Arnold, Susan A. Smith
1851-A.C. Gillet, Miss Ann Truchel
1852-No record.
1853-Wallace Furguson, Jeremiah Hoover, Miss Orr.
1854-A.K. Bush, Miss Orr
1855-S. Comstock, Mr Price.
1856-James Henderson.
1857--No record
1858-W.W. Preston, Miss Martha Guering.
1859 No record.
1860-Marvin Raymond, Lucia Fenn.
1861-Solomon Underhill
1862-Mr Watson, S.M. Wellman.
1863-D.B. Taylor, Mary Tucker.
1864-Mr. Howard.
1865-John Judson
1866-No record.
1867-Nancy Ferguson
1868-S.M. Wellman
1869-F.E. Wolcott
1870-71-S.M. Wellman
1872-76-No record
1877-J.F. Sopmers.
1878-O.A. Vaughn.
(There are other entries, but my copy ends there. The Chelsea District Library and the Library of Michigan have it on microform.)

[Contributed by Marti Hause, marti3543 (at) aol.com]

ca 1935/05/21
Tuesday

unidentified
clipping

Fall Results in Death of Farmer

Saline —-A fractured skull and internal injuries resulting from a fall from a silo on which he was making repairs, resulted in the death Tuesday of Henry Burt Waters, 75, well-known Lodi township farmer. Mr. Waters died an hour after the accident.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the Graham funeral home in Ann Arbor, with Rev. Theodore R. Schmale officiating. Interment will be in Forest Hills cemetery.

Mr. Waters had lived his entire life on the same farm in Lodi. He was married February 14, 1884, to Addie Forshee, and a year ago they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary.

He is survived by the widow; two daughters, Mrs. C. E. Stewart, of Wyoming, Minn., and Mrs. J. F. Oliver, of Lake Stevens, Wash.; two sons, Bert, Jr., and Guy, at home; two brothers, David of Fowlerville, and G. M. Waters, Ann Arbor; and 12 grandchildren.

[Contributed by Charla Kurtz, charlakurtz (at) yahoo.com, The Lyke and Livingston Families]

later than
May, 1935

unidentified
clipping

Mrs. Addie Waters, widow of the late Henry Burt Waters, died this morning at her home in Lodi township, after a lingering illness. She was born May 1, 1862, in Salem township, the daugher of the late Henry and Jane Forshee, and was married to Mr. Waters, prominent Lodi township farmer, Feb. 14, 1884. He died May 21, 1935. She was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. C. E. Stewart of Wyoming, Minn., and Mrs. J. F. Oliver of Portland, Ore.; two sons, Guy F. and Henry Burt, Jr., both at home; a sister, Miss Winifred Forshee of Detroit; four brothers, Frank Forshee of Conway, Mich., John Forshee of Ann Arbor, Fred Forshee of Gaines, and Cub Forshee of Plymouth; 12 grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and several nephews and nieces.

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon at the Muehlig chapel with Rev. Theodore R. Schmale officiating. Interment will be in Forest Hill cemetery. Friends may call at the chapel.

[Contributed by Charla Kurtz, charlakurtz (at) yahoo.com, The Lyke and Livingston Families]

1942/04/23
Friday

Michigan Daily
(Univ. of Mich.)

[article]
Pg.1

E. N. Brown, Educator, Dies
One of Oldest Graduates Succumbs in Chelsea

One of the University's oldest graduates, Edwin N. Brown,'83, died Tuesday afternoon after suffering a brief illness at the Methodist home in Chelsea.

A well known educatior in Michigan and Ohio, he was the holder of four degrees from the University and was a member of the Emeritus Club.

Brown entered the University in 1979, received his bachelor of arts degree in 1883, his master's the following year, the bachelor of law degree in 1887 and a doctor of philosophy degree in 1902. He was 82 years old.

Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. today in St. Andrew's church and will be conducted by Dr. Henry Lewis, rector.

1954/03/05
Friday

Ann Arbor
News

[article]
Pg.10

Ypsilanti Couple Will Open Home For Anniversary

YPSILANTI —-Mr. and Mrs. H. Clay Pepper are planning an open house from 2 to 8 p.m. Sunday at their home, 434 N. Hamilton St., to celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary, which occurred yesterday.

Mrs. Pepper is the former Bertha Cone. Both she and Mr. Pepper are natives of Milan, where they still belong to the Marble Memorial Methodist Church. After their marriage March 4, 1904, they lived about two months in Detroit, where Mr. Pepper had been employed. Moving to Milan, he worked in a grocery, and then for the Stimpson Scale Co.

When the scale company moved to Northville about 1906, the Peppers moved, too, living there about eight years. They have lived here since 1914. Mr. Pepper worked for the DJ&C Railroad before buying, in 1928, the grocery he now owns on N. Hamilton St.

The Peppers have a son, Wyland Pepper, employed at the Ypsilanti State Hospital, and three grandchildren.

Mr. Pepper is a life member Mason here, and Mrs. Pepper is a past matron and life member of the Order of Eastern Star. She works every day in their grocery, although Mr. Pepper does not because of illness.

[Contributed by Marjorie Shelton, mkshelton (at) aol.com Comment: There is a photo included with the article. Above the photo is printed "Married 50 Years" and below is "Mr. and Mrs. H. Clay Pepper".]

1955/03/10
Thursday

unidentified
clipping
(Ypsilanti)
[article]
Pg.?

Mr., Mrs. Bina W. Pepper Observe Golden Anniversary

Mr. and Mrs. Bina Ward Pepper, 967 Auburndale, are celebrating their Golden Wedding Anniversary today. They were married on March 10, 1905, at the Methodist parsonage in Ypsilanti. Mr. Pepper was born in London Township, Monroe County, on November 6, 1883, while Mrs. Pepper, formerly Mary Ann Switzer, was born in Germany on July 19, 1882. The couple have 14 children, including 10 boys and four girls. The family, most of them still residing in Ypsilanti, includes Mrs. Mary Smith, Mrs. Mertie Hanna, Ann Arbor; Mrs. Dorothy Hedlesky, Ann Arbor; Elmer, Whittaker; Glenn, Plymouth; Earl, Harold, Richard and Lloyd, Whittaker; Raymond, Mrs. Frieda Kingsbury and Donald. Two sons who have passed away are Ernest and Ralph. They also have 35 grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Mr. and Mrs. Pepper have resided in the Ypsilanti area for 38 years and at their present address for 33 years.

[Contributed by Marjorie Shelton, mkshelton (at) aol.com Comment: Includes a photograph.]

1963/01/08
Tuesday

Ann Arbor
News

[death column]
Pg.19

Mrs. Rubena Grau

CHELSEA-- Mrs. Rubena A. Grau, 66, died Monday in St. Joseph Mercy Hospital where she had been a patient since Dec. 28, 1962. She and her husband, Arthur W. Grau, have farmed at 3420 M-52 in Sylvan township for more than 30 years. Mrs. Grau was born June 11, 1896, in Freedom township, the daughter of John and Christine Schoen Stabler. She was married to Mr. Grau on Feb. 24, 1921 in Freedom township. She was a member of Zion Lutheran Church of Rogers Corners and the Women of Zion. She is survived by her husband; a son, Lloyd A. Grau of Chelsea; a daughter, Mrs. Loren (Dorothy) Koengeter of Freedom township; a brother Oscar Stabler of Bridgewater, and four grandchildren. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at the Zion Lutheran Chruch at Rogers Corners with the Rev. C.J. Renner officiating. Burial will be in Zion Lutheran Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the church memorial fund. Friends may call at the Staffan Funeral Home in Chelsea until 11 a.m. Thursday, and at the church from nooon until the time of services.

1963/01/12
Saturday

Ann Arbor
News

[death column]
Pg.?

Arthur Merritt

Arthur J. Merritt, 65, of 1031 W. North Territorial Rd., an area resident for the past 17 years, was found dead Friday at his home of unknown causes. Mr. Merritt was born on Nov. 11, 1897, in Ypsilanti, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Giles Merritt. He and Elizabeth Barber were married on May 24, 1919, at Fife Lake, Michigan. She survives. The couple lived at Fife Lake for 12 years following their marriage. They moved to this area in 1946. Mr. Merritt was a farmer most of his life. Survivors, in addition to his wife, include a son, Walter of Milan, five daughters, Mrs. Kittie M. Farr of Grand Rapids, Mrs. Evelyn R. Johnson of Inkster, Mrs. Phyllis J. Johnson of Ypsilanti, Mrs. Elfreda L. Tomes of Detroit and Miss Mildred Merritt of Arizona; 34 grandchildren and two great grandchildren; a step-son, Lewis Barer of Whitmore Lake; and a step-daughter, Mrs. Villet Jackson, of Missouri, a sister Mrs. Mildren Walters of California and two step-brothers, Willard Merritt of California and Clarence Merritt of Saline. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Geer Funeral Home, with the Rev. Robert Webber of Milan officiating. Burial arrangments are incomplete. Friends may call at the Geer Funeral Home in Ypsilanti beginning Sunday.

1963/01/21
Monday

Ann Arbor
News

[death column]
Pg.27

William F. Raaf

William F. Raaf, 83, died Saturday evening at his home 741 Packard St. Mr. Raaf was born Dec. 18, 1879 in Germany, a son of John M. and Katherine Tufe
[Tufel?] Raaf. He came to Ann Arbor with his parents when he was two years old. He was employed as supervisor with the Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. for 45 years before retiring in 1946. For 10 years he was a utility man with Hoover Ball and Bearing before retiring six years ago. Mr. Raaf was a member of Zion Lutheran Church. He also was a member of Golden Rule Masonic Lodge No. 159, F & AM, and Zal Gaz Grotto No. 34. In August 1906, he married Mabel Shannon of Ann Arbor. She died on Jan. 28, 1940. On Nov. 16, 1961, Mr. Raaf married Grace Welsh. She survives. Other survivors are a brother, John J. Raaf, sr.; a sister, Mrs. Katherine Horning, both of Ann Arbor, a nephew, John J. Raaf, jr. of Ann Arbor, and a niece, Mrs. Edna Smith of Portland, Ore. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Muehlig chapel with the Rev. Fred Holtfreter officiating. Burial will be in Forest Hill Cemetery. Friends may call at the chapel. Memorial contributions may be made to the Zion church fund.

1963/01/21
Monday

Ann Arbor
News

[death column]
Pg.27

Arthur Armbruster.

SALINE - Arthur A. Armbruster, 77, of 327 N. Ann Arbor St., a resident of Saline for the past 43 years died Friday night at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor after becoming suddenly ill earlier that day. Mr. Armbruster was born on Sept. 6, 1885, in York township, a son of Arron and Minnie Falk Armbruster. He and Emma Kilgus were married on Nov. 25, 1908 in York township. She survives. The couple lived in Pittsfield township following their marriage until moving to their present Saline address in 1920. Mr. Armbruster was a member of St. Paul's United Church of Christ in Saline. He also was a member of Saline Masonic Lodge No. 311, F & AM and of the Saline Chapter No. 311 of the Order of Eastern Star. He was a member of the Tri-County Sportsman League and of the Stony Creek Gleeners lodge. Survivors, in addition to his wife, include two sons, Elvin L. of Saline, and Lloyd A. of Atlanta, Ga.; nine grandchildren; a brother, Walter, of Saline, two sisters, Mrs. Stella King and Mrs. Lucille Lake, both of Ann Arbor; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by an infant daughter, and by a brother, Eugene Armbruster. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday at the Bahnmiller Funeral Home in Saline, with the Rev. Alfred P. Hardt officiating. Burial will be in Oakwood Cemetery, Saline. Memorial contributions may be made to the St. Paul's United Church of Christ Building Fund. Friends may call at the funeral home. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Muehlig chapel with the Rev. Fred Holtfreter officiating. Burial will be in Forest Hill Cemetery. Friends may call at the chapel. Memorial contributions may be made to the Zion church fund.

1969/03/06
Thursday

Ann Arbor News
[obituary]
Pg.34

Millen, DeWitt Clinton
409 E. Madison St. —-
Age 89, passed away last evening at his home, the last member of a pioneer family. Born July 31, 1879 in Ann Arbor, he was the son of Charles S. and Elizabeth Voy Millen. He attended Ann Arbor High School and was a graduate of the University of Michigan. Mr. Millen worked for many years in his father's dry goods store which was located at 111 S. Main St. He served for two years in World War I overseas in the Ambulance Corp. He was a member of V.F.W.-Graf O'Hara Post 423 and the Elks Lodge 325. He is survived by his wife, Lelia E. Jackson Millen. Graveside services only will be held at 1:30 p.m. Friday in Forest Hill Cemetery with the Rev. Chester H. Loucks officiating. Military services will be conducted by the Veterans of Foreign Wars. Arrangements are being made by the Muehlig Funeral Chapel.
-Muehlig Chapel

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

1970/11/29
Sunday

Ann Arbor News
[obituary]
Pg.3

Millen, Mrs. DeWitt C. (Lelia E.)
Hillside Terrace (formerly of E. Madison St.) —-
Age 91, died early Saturday afternoon at Hillside Terrace. Born July 28, 1879, in Rushville, New York, she was the daughter of Orange L. and Nancy Husted Jackson. Mrs. Millen had been an Ann Arbor resident for many years. She married Mr. Millen on May 7, 1931. He died March 5, 1969. Mr. Millen was a former Ann Arbor businessman. Mrs. Millen was a graduate of Rushville High School, Brockport Normal College, and the University of Michigan School of Nursing. She was also a member of the Ladies Auxiliary, Graf O'Hara Post No. 423 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Washtenaw Humane Society. Surviving are: a nephew, Earl J. Foster, of Florida; a niece, Ruth Smith, of New York; and a close friend, Mrs. Harry B. (Augusta) White of Ann Arbor. Memorial services will be held at 3 p.m. Tuesday from the chapel at Hillside Terrace with Rev. Chester H. Loucks officiating. Cremation has been made. Memorial contributions may be made to the Humane Society. Arrangements by:
-Muehlig Chapel

[Contributed by S. Brevoort for Steve Forester, steveforester (at) yahoo.com]

This index is a work in progress, not a complete listing. Comments in [blue brackets] were added by the editor. The check box  indicates the news item has been verified against the original on microfilm. Items not listing a contributor were collected by Bobbie Snow; otherwise, the contributor's name is given following the text. This material may not be reproduced in any form except to print a copy as needed for personal research.